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Sweeteners: The Inside Scoop



In an effort to better our diets, we often look for healthier choices — especially when it comes to sugar alternatives. Instead of sugar, a large number of shoppers reach for low calorie artificial sweeteners, believing that doing so will offer a similar taste without the guilt and adverse health effects. According to preliminary research, however, artificial sweeteners can do more harm than good. Study results recently presented at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society’s 99th Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida, showed that low calorie, artificial sweeteners could be detrimental to the body’s metabolism.

Results showed that “large consumption of these sugar substitutes could promote fat accumulation, especially in people who are already obese.” Researchers found that there was an increase in glucose transport into cell and overexpression of fat-producing genes, as well as an overexpression of sweet taste receptors in fat tissue.

“We believe that low calorie sweeteners promote additional fat formation by allowing more glucose to enter the cells, and promotes inflammation, which may be more detrimental in obese individuals,” says Sabyasachi Sen, MD, an Associate Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and the study’s principal investigator.

Researchers believe that the findings signify metabolic dysregulation causing cellular mechanisms to make more fat. The effects were most apparent in “obese individuals who consumed low-calorie sweeteners, rather than individuals of normal weight.”

So how do we educate ourselves more about these sweeteners and how it affects obese and overweight patients? For starters, join us on Wednesday, June 14 at 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) for a complementary webcast featuring Registered Dietitian Laurie Shank entitled, How Sweet it is:  Navigating the World of Natural and Artificial Sweeteners. During the webcast, Laurie will discuss commonly used types of natural, caloric sweeteners in the U.S. food supply, as well as the types of artificial, non-nutritive sweeteners approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. while identifying the health risks and benefits of caloric and non-caloric sweetening agents as they relate to health and weight management.

If you want to learn more about artificial sweeteners and the effects on the body this is a presentation you don’t want to miss! To register and find out more, click here.

Source: Endocrine Society


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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