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Relating Mental Health & Behavior to the Weight Loss Journey




In my experience working at the Dr. Rogers Centers, a provider of fitness, wellness and weight loss services in San Antonio, Texas, behavioral techniques are introduced to help participants modify eating and exercise habits. Weight loss program participants have access to a Licensed Professional Counselor/Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor to receive cognitive behavioral therapy to help treat their symptoms and how to think differently about food and their lives.

What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?
According to the National Association of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a form of psychotherapy that emphasizes the importance of thinking about how we feel and what we do. Much of this therapy involves changing our thoughts about different aspects of our lives. This therapy also utilizes mindfulness therapy to keep the participant in the present moment to help relieve anxieties about past experiences.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques can help controlling cravings and primitive impulses. Cravings and other addictive behaviors that trigger pleasure are controlled by our limbic system, sometimes called the “lizard brain.” Our primal instincts are managed in this part of the brain as well. During mindfulness therapy, breathing techniques are used to reengage the frontal cortex. The frontal cortex supports impulse control and is also responsible for decision making. Weight loss program participants can make clearer, conscious decisions about their cravings through this simple therapy.

The Reciprocal Relationship
Many weight loss program participants suffer from co-occurring disorders — typically obesity and depression, or obesity and anxiety. With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, healthcare professionals are able to treat both problems. It is important to treat both issues simultaneously as they are in a reciprocal relationship and will feed off of each other. Learning what our triggers are and recognizing our disordered eating patterns is the key to success. There must be an understanding that food is not the problem; rather, food is fuel for our bodies. The problems lie in our lifestyles, are emotional, and can even involve negative feelings towards certain foods or exercise.

Healthy Supplementation
In addition to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and understanding the relationship between obesity and mental health issues, a professional counselor may recommend supplements to support mental health. Exercise is one example of a “supplement.” It increases dopamine, which is the “feel good” chemical in our brains. Instead of increasing dopamine from unhealthy cravings or other addictions, exercise can be used to achieve this “high.”

Other vitamins and nutrients that are commonly recommended are:

• Vitamin D3: Important for all body functions. For brain health, it helps to release neurotransmitters that affect brain function and development.
• 5-HTP: Converts into two important chemicals: Melatonin and serotonin. Melatonin supports sleep and wake cycles. Serotonin is known for being a “happy chemical” and supports positive mood and outlook.
• Calcium: Essential for healthy brain function. Deficiencies can lead to anxiety and moodiness.

For medical professionals interested in turnkey weight loss programs that incorporate all of the elements for behavioral change for long-lasting results, you can request more information here. Also, take a look at Robard’s upcoming webcast on “Brain Systems Underlying the Munchies.” To register for this webcast, please click here.


Blog written by Gabrielle Harden, Guest Blogger



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Improve Patient Outcomes: The Missing Puzzle Piece



Obesity is the fastest growing health problem in the United States. It’s also proving to be among the most deadly. It kills more Americans every year than AIDS, cancer and all accidents combined. It is the second leading cause of preventable death just below smoking. In fact, 67 percent of the population that are either overweight or obese have a greater probability of developing hypertension, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. This translates to over 300,000 deaths per year from obesity related complications.1 

While the health costs of obesity are taking an enormous toll on population health, it remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. According to the American Medical Association, only 42 percent of adult obesity patients reported receiving any prior advice from a physician to lose weight.2 This is a problem. Obesity is not only a chronic disease that affects over 35 percent of adults in the U.S., but it is often the root cause or associated with over 59 comorbidities. (Read more information on comorbidities here.)

Robard has helped countless physicians from large and small group practices get started with minimal effort. For example, Dr. Michelle Haendiges of Haendiges & Associates, P.C., like many physicians, was new to obesity treatment and wanted to be sure that she could add this service without any interruption of her normal business flow. Now, she believes that obesity treatment is the most rewarding thing she’s done, that patients want real help, and that the physician is the best person to do it.  In the video below, Dr. Haendiges talks more about her story and how obesity treatment has positively influenced her practice.


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

Sources:
1. Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Executive summary. National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, June 1998.
2. Pool, A. C., Kraschnewski, J. L., Cover, L. A., Lehman, E. B., Stuckey, H. L., Hwang, K. O., … Sciamanna, C. N. (2014). The Impact of Physician Weight Discussion on Weight Loss in US Adults. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 8(2), e131–e139. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2013.03.003)

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5 Ways to Mix Up a Weight Loss Shake



For dieters who need to lose 40 pounds or more, traditional methods of diet and exercise are oftentimes not enough. A Low Calorie Diet (LCD) has been shown to be extremely effective in jump-starting the weight loss process. Often LCDs utilize various meal replacement products, primarily shakes. And anyone who’s been on a diet before knows that the same shakes can get monotonous after the first couple of months.

Fortunately, there is a multitude of ways that you can spruce up a shake and look forward to your next meal replacement — and you can do a lot with items you probably already have in your kitchen cupboards. Take a look at our slideshow (below) that gives you five ways to shake up your shakes! Mixing it up can definitely help give you the encouragement to stick with your diet.



While shakes are often the go-to in meal replacements, there are also a lot of different kinds of low calorie meal replacements that are packed with nutrition, fulfilling, and most importantly, delicious! For example, take a look at the wide variety of meal replacement products that Robard offers. Are you a provider looking to carry meal replacements for a medically supervised program? Contact us to try some free samples!


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corportion

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