RobardUser Robard Corporation | Healthy Lifestyle

Why Weight Loss is Not as Simple as Cutting Calories



When it comes to calorie counting, not many people — if any at all — like doing it. It’s monotonous, tedious and restrictive, and it takes all the joy out of eating. You counted all your calories, so you should be losing weight, right? Well, not necessarily. If you stop to think about what a calorie is, you will find that it’s not just how many calories you consume that affects healthy weight loss, but what kinds of calories.

Simply put, a calorie is a unit of energy. Our bodies actually need calories to survive because without energy, our cells would die, and our organs would stop functioning. We acquire this energy through food and drink in the form of calories. The number of calories food contains tells us how much potential energy they possess.

Keeping track of how many calories one consumes is, of course, important to weight loss. If you burn off more calories than you consume through physical activity, the body will locate other calories to burn for energy, ultimately using the calories from the body’s fat reserves, and thus stimulating weight loss.

The problem comes in when “empty calories” are consumed; that is, foods high in energy but low in nutritional value. Such foods include fast foods, and foods high in fat and/or sugar, such as ice cream and bacon. More than 11 percent of Americans’ daily calories come from fast foods, and Americans consume an average of 336 calories per day from sugary beverages alone. To put it more simply, 2,000 calories in the form of vegetables and lean protein will provide a very different result than 2,000 calories in the form of a large fast food burger.

Ultimately, to achieve fast and, most importantly, healthy weight loss, it is important to advise patients to stick to a low calorie diet, but through foods and supplements that are high in nutritional value. Many people continue to find it challenging to stick to a low calorie diet on their own. This is why it is important for health professionals to be proactive in asking overweight patients about their weight loss goals*, and educating them not just about the benefits of achieving a healthy weight, but also about the options that are available to them, such as a Very Low Calorie Diet (VLCD) or Low Calorie Diet (LCD). With a medically supervised VLCD, patients could expect to lose three-five pounds a week, enjoying a variety of meal replacements, snacks, and food products that taste great and are scientifically designed to have high nutritional value.

Obesity is on the rise, and healthcare costs and early mortality rates are rising with it. But adding weight loss as a service for your patients is easier than you might think, and can actually get started in 60 days or less with the help of an experienced partner. Contact Robard today and learn how you can increase the quality of care for your patients by starting an obesity treatment program.

*For practical tips on how to speak with patients about their weight, check out this free webcast!

Source: Medical News Today


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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How You Can Treat Arthritis – By Not Treating Arthritis



For every pound of excess weight, four pounds of extra pressure are put on the knees. Needless to say, overweight and obese people are at much higher risk of developing arthritis. In fact, an obese person has a 60 percent greater risk of getting arthritis than people who maintain a healthy body weight.

One in five Americans has been diagnosed with arthritis, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that number jumps to more than one in three among obese people — and two out of three Americans are either overweight or obese.

“Weight plays an important role in joint stress, so when people are very overweight, it puts stress on their joints, especially their weight-bearing joints, like the knees and the hips,” says Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology division at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.

While many may disregard arthritis as unimportant and non-life threatening, it is in fact a chronic condition with serious impact on people’s lives. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, and can lead to many debilitating problems for overweight people, from daily pain and discomfort, decreased mobility, and may even necessitate surgery.

One study examined the factors contributing to total knee and hip replacements in people between the ages of 18 and 50. A remarkable 72 percent of those who underwent joint replacement surgery were obese.

Weight loss has been shown to be effective in decreasing the effects, prevalence, and onset of many comorbid conditions, particularly arthritis. A study of overweight women showed that a weight loss of merely 11 pounds reduced their risk of developing knee Osteoarthritis by half.

Healthcare costs attributed to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions (AORC) in the United States in 2003 was approximately $128 billion, and is continuing to increase as obesity continues to rise.  For providers who have patients that suffer from arthritis, or who are at risk for arthritis, weight loss using a medically supervised program can mean an enhanced quality of life for their patients, as well as provide a cost effective solution to arthritis, and many other comorbid conditions.

In a quickly changing healthcare climate, providers must be quick to adopt smarter and cost-effective strategies to reduce expenditures while maximizing quality of care. Treating comorbid conditions singularly without looking at the bigger picture of what is causing these ailments will increasingly become a costly mistake for both physicians and their patients. Talk to Robard today about how to streamline your patient care efforts by starting a medical weight management program today.

Sources: CDC, John Hopkins Arthritis Center, Everyday Health, Arthritis Foundation


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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