Walk the Walk: Robard’s VP of Sales Gets with the Program

by Robard Corporation Staff February 17, 2017


If you're going to talk the talk, you've got to walk the walk. And that’s just what Robard Corporation’s Vice President of Sales, Mario Testa, decided to do on Super Bowl Sunday 2016. As the Denver Broncos defeated the Carolina Panthers, Mario was set to launch his own fight. He weighed 217 pounds, felt sluggish, tired and had very little energy. He had never struggled with weight as a youth, but age, lack of exercise, work, travel and, what he calls “perhaps a bit of laziness,” took their toll.

“I didn’t feel I was heavy until I saw a picture that ‘woke me up,’” recalls Testa. “It was a picture of me at my son’s sports banquet. It actually brought tears to my eyes.”

Mario had calculated that he had gained 85 pounds since he graduated high school — nearly three pounds a year. In addition to the weight, he faced a handful of related medical conditions, including high cholesterol and triglycerides and pre-diabetes. However, after just a week of using New Direction System products mixed with an occasional NutriMed shake, he began to notice a difference.

“I could tell it was working — and I was being disciplined to the program — because my pants felt a bit loose,” he says. “It was a huge motivator because I never ‘dieted’ before.”

Within a few weeks, his energy was improving, and he wasn’t getting out of breath as quickly. “I started exercising and being more active with my kids,” he says. “It also increased my confidence because I didn’t feel self-conscious anymore.”

Along with products, Testa began a simple exercise routine. He would walk around his neighborhood three nights a week and run on a treadmill one night a week without setting a distance or time. “I just do it until I work up a good sweat,” says Mario.

The discipline paid off. Now at 162 pounds, Mario’s showing no signs of slowing down. He’s got his eyes set on a strength conditioning program, and says that the current state of his health is excellent.

“My whole outlook on food has improved, he says. “I’m much more disciplined with what I eat, when I eat, how I eat and no longer have the cravings for the foods that fell into my danger zone. I’ve been able to keep all the weight off after nearly a year on the program.”

Mario never thought he would be so passionate about how losing weight and keeping it off could have such a positive impact on the overall quality his life — physically and emotionally. “I’m a true evangelist for healthy lifestyle and a disciple for our products,” he says. “It hasn’t changed my life. It saved my life.”

To find a New Direction System or NutriMed program near you, please visit our Find a Clinic page. If you’re a healthcare provider interested in Robard’s proven weight management programs, nutrition products and business services, you can learn more by visiting us here.


Blog written by Kevin Boyce/Robard Corporation

Why You Should Discuss Exercise and Weight Loss with Your Aging Patients

by Robard Corporation Staff February 14, 2017


In our recent blog post about 6 Unexpected Benefits of Exercise, we learned that not only can exercise help you lose weight and feel great, but it can also help improve memory and overall brain performance, and even help protect from cognitive decline. This insight is all the more important when talking to older adults about exercise and weight loss.

More than half of all 85-year-olds suffer some form of dementia. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, dementia is a broad term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other thinking skills severe enough to reduce a person's ability to perform everyday activities. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

Dementia has begun to be thought of as an inevitability of aging; however, recent research has shown that that is not necessarily true. Neuroscientist Art Kramer, who directs the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois, says the best thing you can do for your brain is exercise.

In his 2010 study, Kramer found that with just 45 minutes, three days a week of moderate aerobic exercise (mostly walking), MRI scans showed that for the aerobic group, the volume of their brains actually increased, while individuals in the control group lost about 1.5 percent of their brain volume. This added up to a 3.5 percent difference between individuals who took part in aerobic exercise and those who did not. Further tests showed that increased brain volume translated into better memory.

For providers working with aging patients, the strong possibility of preventing or delaying the onset of dementia-related illnesses such as Alzheimer’s can prove to be a great motivator in encouraging patients to engage in more regular exercise. Approaching them about their weight is a critical step in the right direction. By doing so, they’ll start to also feel the other great benefits of weight management and exercise, such as a potential decrease in related comorbid conditions, reliance on medications, and more.

To alleviate some of the potential discomfort in having conversations about weight with your patients, Robard Corporation has produced a three part video series, “How to Speak with Patients about Obesity,” that presents multiple avenues one could take while speaking with patients about obesity. We invite you to watch this free educational resource by clicking here.

We invite all healthcare providers to learn more about Robard’s proven weight management programs, products and services. To do so, please click here and try some of our delicious nutritional products for free!


Sources: NPR, Alzheimer’s Association


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: Exercise | For Dieters | For Providers | Obesity | Treating Obesity | Weight Loss Programs

Healthier Concession Stand Options Yield Positive Results

by Robard Corporation Staff February 7, 2017


When we go a sporting event, chances are we’re going to visit the concession stand during the game. The lines may be long and the prices exorbitant, but we still get in the queue for one thing: The food. And let’s be honest, no one goes to a sporting event concession stand to eat a salad. And while the options we have at these events generally don’t lead to healthy food choices, a recent study may show that a revamped concession stand menu may not only help people’s diets, but overall profits as well.

The University of Iowa and Cornell University joined a booster organization to perform a study to see what happens when healthier options were made available to people that attended sporting events at Muscatine High School in Muscatine, Iowa, for two fall sports seasons one year apart. The results? “We found that an average of 77 percent of students purchased healthier foods when they were available and that revenue also increased when a variety of healthy items were available,” says study co-author Brian Wansink, PhD, Professor and Director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab.

Whether the students thought adding healthy options was important or not, an overwhelming majority — 77.5 percent — purchased at least one healthy item from the concession stand at some point in the school year. Although the study has a small sample size and is focused on one school and their students, the findings may open to the door to adding healthier items at large scale sporting events.

Millions of people go through the turnstile annually to see their favorite team or player perform, and many of them will purchase items at the concession stands. There is no guarantee that they will purchase a healthy option when looking at the menu, but studies like this suggest that just making the healthy options available could lead to better choices made by the consumer. The fact that the study also showed an increase in sales (9.2 percent of total sales went to healthier items) indicates that the healthier choices also could help overall profits. That’s big business when you’re looking at a sold out football stadium.

Until healthier choices become more readily available at these events, you can still take action to stay on track and maintain a good diet. For example, bring a small snack of your own. A simple plan like this helps to develop good habits and reinforces avoiding bad ones that could result in unwanted weight gain or stalled progress with your diet. If you’d like to start your own weight loss journey and learn how to make better health decisions, fill out our brief Find a Clinic form and we will find a weight management program near you! In the meantime, game on!


Source: Cornell Food & Brand Lab


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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Filed Under: Eating Habits | For Dieters | For Providers | Healthy Eating | Healthy Lifestyle

A New Solution for Burning Fat Could Be… Fat?

by Robard Corporation Staff February 1, 2017


So fat is fat, and all fat is bad, right?

Wrong.

“Not all fat is equal,” says Professor Alexander Pfeifer from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University Hospital Bonn. Apparently, according to recent research out of University of Bonn, researchers have found a way to use what is called “brown fat” to burn energy from food and stimulate weight loss.

Humans actually have two different kinds of fat: white fat (which is the bad fat that makes our “love handles” that we want to get rid of) and brown fat which acts like a desirable heater to convert excess energy into heat. In essence, white fat stores energy, while brown fat helps the body burn energy through heat. In adults, people with higher amounts of brown fat have lower body mass, and according to studies, increasing brown fat by as little as 50 grams could lead up to a 10 to 20 pound weight loss in one year.

Using adenosine, a new signaling molecule typically released during stress, researchers at University of Bonn have discovered a way to activate these brown fat cells, and even turn white fat cells into brown fat cells, a process called “browning.”

More recently, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes identified an FDA-approved drug that can help create more of this brown fat. “Introducing brown fat is an exciting new approach to treating obesity and associated metabolic diseases, such as diabetes,” said study first author Baoming Nie, PhD, a former postdoctoral scholar at Gladstone.

Such a method of treating obesity is still in the research phase, and may not likely become a commonly accepted practice for some time yet. There are several potential side effects that may arise from taking the drug, and more development is necessary before human trials can be explored. Nonetheless, it is an exciting direction in the field of obesity treatment that healthcare professionals should keep a close eye on.

In the meantime, weight management is still an urgent need for so many across the country. For healthcare providers, there are already many effective ways to begin treating obesity. Learn more about how to start a weight management program, or if you are a dieter, connect with a provider who can get you started on your weight loss journey today. Need more inspiration? Listen to some success stories of dieters who have lost more than 200 pounds by starting a medically supervised program.


Source:
ScienceDaily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: Diabetes | Education | For Dieters | For Providers | Obesity | Treating Obesity | Weight Loss Programs

Weight Loss Programs Help Fight Cardiovascular Disease

by Robard Corporation Staff January 27, 2017


One of the biggest benefits, if not the biggest, of losing weight is minimizing or completely remedying other ailments and comorbidities that come with being overweight. Type 2 Diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol, hypertension, sleep apnea and more have been associated with being overweight. Another one is cardiovascular disease, which consists of heart conditions that may include the vessels, structural problems, blood clots, and more. A recent study showed how effective losing weight can be in regards to treating cardiovascular diseases, and the results may surprise you.

One hundred and twenty-nine patients entered into the WAIT (Weight Achievements and Intensive Management) program that lasted 12 weeks and yielded great results: the participants enjoyed an average weight loss of 9.7 percent (24 pounds) and were able to maintain 6.4 percent of that loss (16 pounds) for five years, on average.

Participants of the study were split into two groups. One group were those that achieved seven percent or more of their weight loss, while the second group achieved less than seven percent of their weight loss after a year. The study showed that the group that lost seven percent or more of their initial weight loss (the first group) experienced significant improvements in their comorbidities, which included their A1C levels, their LDL and HDL levels, and improved blood pressure.

“This weight loss was very impressive, since we know from previous research that if this population can maintain a seven percent weight loss, they show a marked improvement in insulin sensitivity and many other cardiovascular risk factors,” says Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, and Medical Director of Joslin Diabetes Center’s obesity clinical program.

Similar studies have shown how effective a proper weight management program can be. The right program can give someone an opportunity to lose weight, maintain the loss, and mitigate or even eliminate the comorbidities that come with it. Sounds like a win-win for the patient and the provider!

Learn more about offering a weight management program, or if you are a dieter needing weight loss assistance, click here.


Source: Joslin Diabetes Center


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: Cardiovascular Disease | For Dieters | For Providers | Treating Obesity | Weight Loss Programs

5 Strategies to Increase Retention and Profitability

by Robard Corporation Staff January 18, 2017


Regardless of industry, it is well known that acquiring a new customer is more expensive and time consuming than keeping a current customer active. According to Bain and Co., it costs approximately six to seven times more to acquire a new customer; in addition, they state that a five percent increase in customer retention can increase a company’s profitability by 75 percent. While these statistics differ based on your industry, the fact remains — keeping your current dieters on program longer is essential to your business growth.

Begin your retention on day one, sale day. Say thank you. While this concept is basic, its value is underestimated. Thank your dieter for choosing your weight loss program — remember, with an increasing amount of choices, they choose you. Consider a hand written card or personalized email.

Three weeks into the program, find out how they are feeling about the program. Get feedback on what they like and don’t like. More importantly, ask questions that will provide insight to how they are feeling about the program and their journey. While “I like the shakes” is important, knowing that they are anxious on weekends because of the lack of routine is more valuable to retention.

Spread the good news; highlight a success story. It is not new that testimonials are powerful. When choosing your testimonial, however, it is better to highlight a dieter who achieves common results. While it is wonderful when a dieter loses 200 pounds, most will lose less. Choose a testimonial story and person that others can relate to.

Finally, address sabotage when it appears. Some dieters change their mindsets after only one month into their program.  As their weight loss advisor, it’s important to recognize sabotaging thoughts and patterns so the dieter can be redirected.

Let’s look at a few examples of when a dieter may veer off track:

1. When a short term goal is achieved. “Everyone is telling me I look great. I don’t need to be serious anymore!” Solution: Have dieters set both short and long term goals beyond the first month. When short term goals are achieved, celebrate and then set new goals immediately.  

2. When the dieter starts to perceive the diet as punishment, they’re not looking at the big picture. “I’m sick of sticking to a diet.” Solution: Celebrate successes with dieters other than the scale. For example, praise a new activity they can enjoy as a result of their weight loss.

3. When the dieter views the diet as deprivation. “I’m missing out. It’s not fair.” Solution: Remind dieters that they are choosing to be on a diet. They can have anything they want, but would they rather choose to enjoy life at their goal weight, or eat a doughnut now?

How would you know your new strategies are working? Keep Data. Key Operating Statistics (KOS) helps you make informed decisions about all of your business questions and modify the course of business for continued growth and future positioning. Keep data relating to inquiries, conversions, drop offs, weight loss achieved and more, and then, deeply analyze the data. While it is good to know how many dieters drop off, it is better to know the most common week that dieter’s leave, and it’s even better to know the reasons why that drop off week is so common so you can implement a strategy to address the reasons behind the loss. Check out this article for harnessing data in the healthcare field. Robard provides customers with an extensive KOS data collection system, for access, contact Robard.

Want more? Access retention resources on www.Robard.com:

1. Video: Customer Service and Compliance: Better Compliance and Retention from Simple Touch Points and More Focused Visits 
2. Staff Training Kit: One Month in Retention Strategies
3. Staff Training Kit: Keep Retention Strong

Not a customer? Request information here.


Blog written by Lynda Lewis/Robard Corporation

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Filed Under: About Robard | Education | For Providers | Weight Loss Programs

Why Should You Eat a Pear a Day?

by Robard Corporation Staff January 11, 2017

Eat an apple a day? What about eat a pear a day? A North Dakota State University study examined the benefits of Bartlett and Starkrimson pears and found that “pears as part of a healthy diet could play a role in helping to manage type 2 diabetes and diabetes-induced hypertension.”



Sources: USA Pears, Science Daily

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Filed Under: Diabetes | Eating Habits | For Dieters | For Providers | Healthy Eating

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About Robard Corporation

www.Robard.com

With more than three decades of field-tested experience in the weight management industry, Robard Corporation’s comprehensive medical and non-medical obesity treatment programs, state of the art nutrition products, and executive level business management services have assisted a vast network of physicians, large medical groups, hospital systems and clinics to successfully treat thousands of overweight and obese patients. Our turnkey programs offer significant business growth potential, and our dedicated team provides hands-on staff training, services and education to add a new, billable service line for safe and effective obesity treatment within 60 days. For more information, visit us at www.Robard.com or call (800) 222-9201.

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