RobardUser Robard Corporation | Diabetes

Study: Providers Cite Lack of Knowledge as a Major Barrier to Treating Patients with Obesity



By now, the need to prioritize obesity treatment in health care is widely accepted. Not a single state met the 2010 Healthy People goal of a 15% obesity rate. Instead, obesity rates have steadily climbed, with over one-third of American adults being obese, and with the United States ranking as one of the most obese countries in the world. And with obesity rates rising, so do the rates of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

With obesity officially having been classified as a disease in 2013 by the American Medical Association, more providers understand the links between obesity and other chronic conditions, as well as the importance of obesity treatment. But a recent study from George Washington University shows that this transition to prioritizing obesity treatment is not an easy one because most providers lack knowledge and understanding of recommended obesity treatments, such as behavioral counseling and pharmacotherapy.

In an accompanying editorial published in Obesity, Robert Kushner, MD, FTOS, examines the impact of this study. He concluded that, “The study suggests that more obesity education is needed among primary health care providers that focuses on knowledge along with enhanced competencies in patient care management, communication, and behavior change.”
 
Staying up-to-date with new information and best practices can be extremely difficult for a busy health care provider while the demands of the business and the patients remain high. But finding partners who can do some of the heavy lifting for you can support you in not only getting the necessary knowledge, but also streamlining your practices and provide you and your staff with the essential training and tools to implement this important service that will help your patients get healthier quicker, while saving your practice time and money.w

We encourage you to take advantage of free resources, like Robard’s three-part webcast series on How to Speak to Patients about Obesity, which can walk you through step-by-step on how to get this conversation started with patients.

If you understand how imperative it is to start addressing weight loss in your patients, but just aren’t sure how to get started, reach out to Robard today!

Source: Science Daily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


Read More >>

You Can’t Afford to Ignore Obesity: How Obesity Treatment Saves Time, Money and Lives



Why should a busy healthcare provider take time out of their day to treat obesity when their patients are dealing with so many other health issues? This seems to be the prevailing question among many providers, despite obesity’s 2013 designation as a disease. There are so many other diseases and ailments that need to be treated, so why obesity?

The answer: Because we can’t afford not to! And that applies to time, money and the health of your patients.

It’s true that chronic diseases suck up the majority of healthcare resources; 75 percent of all health care costs are linked to chronic conditions. People with chronic conditions are the most frequent users of health care in the U.S., and they account for 81 percent of hospital admissions; 91 percent of all prescriptions filled; and 76 percent of all physician visits. Chronic disease is widespread, and it’s only getting worse. By 2025, chronic diseases will affect an estimated 164 million Americans — nearly half (49 percent) of the population

In response to the growing concern over chronic disease, many healthcare providers and hospitals are investing thousands of dollars in resources and time to implement multi-level treatment plans targeting chronic conditions. But the question many advocates are forgetting to ask is: What is one of the most common links between many chronic conditions?

The answer: OBESITY.

Obesity is associated with significantly increased risk of more than 20 chronic diseases and health conditions that cause devastating consequences and increased mortality. Consider the following statistics:

• In the often-cited Framingham Offspring Study, obesity was responsible for 78 percent of cases of hypertension in men and 64 percent in women
• The well-known Nurses’ Health Study of more than 44,000 women found high waist circumference resulted in a two-fold increase in coronary heart disease
More than 85 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight, and more than 50 percent are obese
• Overweight and obesity are associated with increased mortality from diabetes and kidney disease, resulting in over 60,000 excess deaths per year

And this is just the tip of the iceberg. Obesity, in many cases, is the direct cause of many of the chronic conditions that we are spending so much time and money treating. Many of these conditions can be prevented, delayed, or alleviated by simply treating the cause, not just the symptoms. Research shows that modest weight loss (five to 10 percent of body weight) can reduce the risk of developing chronic conditions dramatically, and this amount of weight loss is achievable through various evidence-based medical obesity treatment models.

Not only can obesity treatment save physicians time and money by decreasing healthcare costs associated with comorbid chronic conditions, it has also been shown to be a proven revenue generating model, with real financial benefits. In a climate when we’re unsure about where we will stand with insurance and Medicare, it is imperative for healthcare providers to proactively look for new and innovative models to save time and money, and ultimately, to save lives.

Are you still asking yourself, “Why treat obesity?”


Sources: Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, Hospitals & Health Networks, Stop Obesity Alliance

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


Read More >>

One-Third of the World is Overweight and We Are Part of the Problem



According to a recent article by CNN, 2 billion adults and children worldwide – the equivalent of one-third of the world’s population -- is overweight, and the U.S. is among the countries most severely affected.

The article reflected the results of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that included 195 countries and territories. The study also notes that an increasing number of people globally are dying from comorbid conditions related to obesity, such as cardiovascular disease.

“People who shrug off weight gain do so at their own risk -- risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and other life-threatening conditions,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, who worked on the study. “Those half-serious New Year’s resolutions to lose weight should become year-round commitments to lose weight and prevent future weight gain,” he said in a statement.

The conclusions of the study do important work in highlighting obesity as a growing concern in global public health as a chronic condition in and of itself; however, researchers also hope to educate the public at large about the link between obesity and other diseases in the hopes that preventative measures and treatment can help people avert early mortality. Almost 70 percent of deaths related to an elevated BMI in the analysis were due to cardiovascular disease, killing 2.7 million people in 2015, with diabetes being the second leading cause of death.

The study notes that obesity rates rose in all countries studied, irrespective of the country’s income level. “Changes in the food environment and food systems are probably major drivers,” they write. “Increased availability, accessibility, and affordability of energy dense foods, along with intense marketing of such foods, could explain excess energy intake and weight gain among different populations.”

While obesity rates continue to rise in the U.S., with approximately one-third of our own adult population being overweight or obese, we are luckier than other countries to have access to medical resources that can help curb this epidemic. Now more than ever, the need to begin treating obesity is becoming a public health imperative and medical providers are being called on to lead the charge. (Interested in learning how obesity treatment affects population health? Register for this free webcast!)

Treating obesity is easier than you may think, especially when you work with an experienced partner. Robard takes all the guess work out of treating obesity, and provides all the tools and resources to get you started within 60 days. Join in the conversation that’s happening, not just around the country, but around the world, and learn more about medical weight management today.




Source: CNN

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation



Read More >>