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6 Dieting Myths



“Losing weight is easy!” – said no one ever.

Let’s be honest… losing weight can be extremely challenging, especially when you’re trying to figure it out on your own. Between TV, the internet, magazines, friends and family, and countless other sources that try to tell you how to do it, separating fact from fiction can seem nearly impossible. With all of this information overload, how do you figure out what will work for YOU?

First and foremost, if weight loss has been a challenge, and especially if you need to lose a significant amount of weight, it’s always best to consult a physician, registered dietician, or another professional with a background in weight loss.  There are also many clinics that specialize in weight loss and that have programs that can be tailored to your specific needs, and finding a clinic is not as hard as it may seem. Sometimes, asking for help is the first step to seeing real, long-lasting results.

In the meantime, we’ve done some of the work for you and found some of the most common dieting myths on the Internet. Take a look at the slideshow below with 6 dieting myths you may have heard, as well as the facts behind them!


Source: West Virginia University


Blog written by By: Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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5 Ways to Teach Your Daughter about Healthy Weight & Body Image



In the age of social media, the Internet, reality TV, and pop culture, women and girls face an enormous amount of pressure to look a certain way or be a certain weight. More now than ever, weight and body image concerns create an immense amount of anxiety for women, but increasingly more so for young girls. Girls’ dissatisfaction manifests around body image, particularly weight, at an alarmingly young age:

• Over 80 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat.
• By middle school, 40-70 percent of girls are dissatisfied with two or more parts of their body, and body satisfaction hits rock bottom between the ages of 12 and 15.

And while it’s natural to be concerned about our daughters’ weight and to encourage them to be healthy, a recent study from Cornell Food & Brand Lab says that one of the best things you can do to encourage healthy weight and positive body image is … don’t talk about her weight!

The study published in Eating and Weight Disorders surveyed 501 women between the ages of 20 and 35 and asked them to recall how often their parent(s) commented on their weight. The findings showed that women whose parents were less likely to comment on their weight or how much food they ate were also less likely to be overweight as adults. Interestingly, women who recalled their parents commenting on their weight in their youth were generally more likely to be dissatisfied with their weight in adulthood, regardless of whether they were overweight or not.

“If you're worried about your child's weight, avoid criticizing them or restricting food. Instead, nudge healthy choices and behaviors by giving them freedom to choose for themselves and by making the healthier choices more appealing and convenient," recommends lead author Brian Wansink. "After all, it's the choices that children make for themselves that will lead to lifelong habits." 

If you are a parent and hope to encourage a healthy weight and positive body image in your daughter, there are many other ways to do so that won’t lead to unintended negative affects later in life. Take a look at the slideshow that suggest 5 positive ways to teach your daughter about healthy weight and body image.



Sources: Cornell Food & Brand Lab, NYC Girls Project


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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For Providers, Weight Loss is all in a Day’s Work



What is a healthcare provider’s role in helping a patient lose weight? How about the general health of the patient? Ultimately, healthcare providers are best equipped to diagnose what is ailing a person and, perhaps more importantly, they are well educated in recommending and administering the correct procedures and advice to alleviate ailments.

This is well illustrated in a recent study conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers where 300 overweight people partook in a medically supervised weight loss clinical trial. At the end of the trial, regardless of how much weight was lost, the sentiment of the participants was overwhelming: The support of the provider was extremely helpful.

There can be a push/pull relationship between the patient and the provider, and when discussing weight, it could become an arduous one. However, in this study, once that barrier was broken and the patient was accepting of the provider’s tutelage, there were better results in medication schedules, appointment keeping, and improved outcomes in overall weight loss.

What does all of this mean? With many things in life, people are willing to help you along the way. For some, it’s what they do for a living. Healthcare providers are more than willing to help; it’s an oath that they took. Are you, the dieter, willing to accept their assistance?

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine

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