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How You Discuss Weight with Patients is Just as Important as Treatment: Free Webcast



Good news: Medical providers are finally starting to address obesity and its impact on their patients’ overall health. Bad news: Without a standard to look to for how to discuss weight with their patients and what the best treatment options may be, providers run the risk of fat shaming their patients, leading to unintended negative effects.

A review of recent research presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association looked at how unconscious bias against overweight patients can impact how physicians interact with them about their weight, leading to increased stress for the patient. This stress, combined with feelings of shame, can cause patients to delay treatment and even avoid interacting with health care providers altogether. While providers always mean well, the way in which patients are approached about their weight can make all the difference when it comes to discussing medical concerns with sensitivity.

With obesity only recently being identified as a disease — with links to more than 20 chronic conditions (and growing) that are still being researched — it’s hard to know the best way to proceed with overweight patients without a standard and clear medical protocols to refer to as guidance. You’ve taken the step in acknowledging the importance of addressing obesity with your patients, but where do you go from here?

First off, it is important to acknowledge that no one is the expert at everything. If obesity treatment is not something you have focused on in the past, there can naturally be a learning curve as far as how to discuss it with your patients, and how to move forward with treatment. Working with an experienced partner in weight loss can not only save you time, but it can also help you provide the highest quality care.

We invite you to begin learning about how to speak with your patients about their weight with our complimentary webcast, How to Speak to Patients About Obesity. Learn directly from other doctors and peers in the field about what works, so that you can continue to elevate your standard of care while saving yourself and your patients both time and money.

Good news: If you’ve committed to providing the best care to your patients by choosing to treat obesity, you’re not alone. And we’re here to help.


Source: Science Daily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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You Can’t Afford to Ignore Obesity: How Obesity Treatment Saves Time, Money and Lives



Why should a busy healthcare provider take time out of their day to treat obesity when their patients are dealing with so many other health issues? This seems to be the prevailing question among many providers, despite obesity’s 2013 designation as a disease. There are so many other diseases and ailments that need to be treated, so why obesity?

The answer: Because we can’t afford not to! And that applies to time, money and the health of your patients.

It’s true that chronic diseases suck up the majority of healthcare resources; 75 percent of all health care costs are linked to chronic conditions. People with chronic conditions are the most frequent users of health care in the U.S., and they account for 81 percent of hospital admissions; 91 percent of all prescriptions filled; and 76 percent of all physician visits. Chronic disease is widespread, and it’s only getting worse. By 2025, chronic diseases will affect an estimated 164 million Americans — nearly half (49 percent) of the population

In response to the growing concern over chronic disease, many healthcare providers and hospitals are investing thousands of dollars in resources and time to implement multi-level treatment plans targeting chronic conditions. But the question many advocates are forgetting to ask is: What is one of the most common links between many chronic conditions?

The answer: OBESITY.

Obesity is associated with significantly increased risk of more than 20 chronic diseases and health conditions that cause devastating consequences and increased mortality. Consider the following statistics:

• In the often-cited Framingham Offspring Study, obesity was responsible for 78 percent of cases of hypertension in men and 64 percent in women
• The well-known Nurses’ Health Study of more than 44,000 women found high waist circumference resulted in a two-fold increase in coronary heart disease
More than 85 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight, and more than 50 percent are obese
• Overweight and obesity are associated with increased mortality from diabetes and kidney disease, resulting in over 60,000 excess deaths per year

And this is just the tip of the iceberg. Obesity, in many cases, is the direct cause of many of the chronic conditions that we are spending so much time and money treating. Many of these conditions can be prevented, delayed, or alleviated by simply treating the cause, not just the symptoms. Research shows that modest weight loss (five to 10 percent of body weight) can reduce the risk of developing chronic conditions dramatically, and this amount of weight loss is achievable through various evidence-based medical obesity treatment models.

Not only can obesity treatment save physicians time and money by decreasing healthcare costs associated with comorbid chronic conditions, it has also been shown to be a proven revenue generating model, with real financial benefits. In a climate when we’re unsure about where we will stand with insurance and Medicare, it is imperative for healthcare providers to proactively look for new and innovative models to save time and money, and ultimately, to save lives.

Are you still asking yourself, “Why treat obesity?”


Sources: Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, Hospitals & Health Networks, Stop Obesity Alliance

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Why Do We Regain Weight?



The journey doesn’t really end once you’ve hit your weight loss goal. Once you achieve your desired weight, another goal is automatically set: Keeping the weight off. Some may find this more difficult than losing the weight to begin with, and according to some research there could be some medical reasons behind that.

The Endocrine Society recently released a new statement recommending more research to understand what causes difficulty with long-term weight loss. The statement suggest that it could be more of a biological issue as opposed to a dieter’s unwillingness to continue to do what earned them the weight loss to begin with.

Authors of the statement believe that once the dieter has lost the weight, the combination of decreased energy expended while hunger increased is the perfect recipe for weight regain. “Our therapeutic focus has traditionally been on achieving weight reduction. Most patients can do this; what they have the most trouble with is keeping the weight off,” says Michael W. Schwartz, MD, of the University of Washington in Seattle, and the chair of the task force that authored the statement.

Obesity is an awfully expensive issue in America. According to the Centers for Disease Control Prevention, it costs an estimated $147 million a year to treat obesity. That amount includes treatment for those that lost the weight and regained it. So the question is, what can be done to keep the weight off?

Your best chance at maintaining the weight loss is to going into it with a plan. The beginning part of the process will likely be the most difficult, just like it was when the journey originally started, but with the right focus and the right people behind you it can’t be done.

Although the statement issued by The Endocrine Society emphasized learning the factors for regained weight, that isn’t the only thing they felt deserved further research. Other issues that they felt merit more research were: brain imaging to better understand appetite and feeding behavior, effect of socioeconomic status on obesity risk, the role that diet composition plays in the development of obesity, and more.

Source: The Endocrine Society

Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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