RobardUser Robard Corporation | All posts tagged 'habits'

Childhood Obesity Predictors May Not Be What You Think (Part 1)



Finding the motivation to pursue a healthy weight can be difficult sometimes. But a new study out of Stanford University may be able to add an increased sense of urgency and purpose, particularly for parents: Do it for the kids!

Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years. While many factors have contributed to this, including increased access to fast foods and higher birth weight, more evidence shows that the factor that puts children at greatest risk of being overweight is having obese parents.

“The findings of this study suggest that at-risk children may be identifiable in the first few years of life,” says W. Stewart Agras, MD, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, whose team assessed both established and hypothesized risk factors in a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Pediatrics.

Agras says parental obesity represented the most potent risk factor, a finding that confirms previous observations, and the connection between overweight parents and overweight children is likely due to a combination of genetics and family environmental influences.

Childhood obesity can lead to many other health issues for children. According to the American Obesity Association, pediatricians are reporting more frequent cases of obesity-related diseases such as type-2 diabetes, asthma and hypertension — diseases that once were considered adult conditions.

It can be emotionally conflicting to think about the ways that one’s own health can negatively impact one’s children. But remember that the focus of this study and its findings is not about blame or shaming overweight parents, but rather about prevention. “It’s important to identify risk factors because they may provide a way to alter the child’s environment and reduce the chance of becoming overweight,” Agras says.

Remember: Good health is paramount for many reasons. The first reason is YOU. Obesity can prevent you from living a long, happy, and healthy life. The next reason is the people that you love. You play an integral role in building a healthy family. But while bad eating and exercise habits in children can be passed down from parents, the good news is that we have the power to change those unhealthy habits for ourselves, as well as for our children. Stay tuned for Part 2 for 5 tips for a healthier family….


Sources: American Heart Association, News Medical, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation




Read More >>

The Best Time to Exercise for Weight Loss



With the hectic, fast-paced lifestyle that many Americans live, oftentimes our conversations around exercise get stuck on where we can sneak in 10 minutes of physical activity between work and errands. While regular physical activity throughout the day is of course important to our overall health and well-being, when it comes to exercising for weight loss two things may be more of a factor than we ever imagined: Making the time and timing it right.

According to some recent studies, the time of day that you engage in exercise may actually help us maximize the effectiveness of our workouts. A 2010 study of 28 healthy adult men found that despite increasing the amount of calories and the amount of fat they consumed, the group that exercised first thing in the morning prior to eating breakfast managed to avoid any weight gain, in comparison to the group of men who consumed the same amount of fat and calories but who worked out after breakfast.

While it is a small and short-term study, the findings were very interesting in that they supported the idea that timing one’s workout to occur after a long period of fasting (or first thing in the morning) will support more rapid weight loss. The idea behind this is that your body will be geared toward burning your stored fat reserves, as opposed to utilizing its energy toward burning off the food you just ate.

Now, if you are like many, the idea of waking up one to two hours earlier to exercise may not sound appealing. But if you want to give it a shot to make the most of your workout, there are some simple things you can do to help you be a little bit more bright-eyed and bushy-tailed before a refreshing morning workout:

1. Go to sleep earlier: Easier said than done for many, but early to bed, early to rise!
2. Find a morning workout buddy: A friend can make drudging out in the morning a little bit more fun, plus you’ll have the pressure/motivation of knowing someone is waiting on you.
3. Set up your morning the night before: Before going to bed, set your coffee pot to brew when your alarm clock goes off (smell that caffeine!), lay out your gym clothes for a quick change, and have a pre-made pre-exercise snack ready to go. Once you convince yourself to get out of bed, you can be ready for the gym and out the door in 10 minutes or less, making it feel less like a drag.

Changing up your workout schedule may seem difficult at first, but after a few weeks of commitment and consistency, you may start to appreciate the benefits, not only for weight loss, but also with being able to start your morning off on a productive note. A morning workout can help to set the tone for the rest of the day, and you may find that it can support you in flourishing throughout many aspects of your work and personal life. Give it a try and let us know on Facebook what the difference has been in your mood and your health!


Source:
Business Insider


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

Read More >>

5 Reasons We Don't Eat in Moderation

When it comes to good eating habits a common term we hear is “eat in moderation.” But what does that mean? If I put a bag of chips in between two people and ask them to take out a moderate amount it’s unlikely they’d be the same. How different would the two be? Should they even be the same? Just what is “eating in moderation?”
 
A study conducted at the University of Georgia and headed by lead author Michelle vanDellen, sought out to find the true definition of moderate eating and how people in general viewed moderation. What they found was if on one end you had overeating and on the other end you eat as much as you should, our view of moderation lands somewhere in the middle.

Why is this an issue? “People are now saying, ‘Diets don’t work; you shouldn’t go on a diet. You should just live by the rule of moderation,’” says vanDellen, an assistant professor in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of psychology. You are leaving the role of deciding what’s moderate in the hands of the consumer, and with the rise of the obesity rate it’s difficult to say that we are doing a good job in practicing moderation.

Researchers found that moderation is naturally seen differently depending on who you ask, and also depending what is being eaten. What are some deciding factors in what we consider moderate eating?


Source: University of Georgia


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation


Read More >>