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Fat Acceptance: Can you be Content and Happy in your Own Skin?



I’ve struggled with weight all of my adult life. At times, I was sickly thin. Other times, I was bloated and uncomfortable in my own skin. Both experiences have given me a perspective on what it’s like to be overweight and underweight.

At my heaviest, I easily clear 260 pounds — I am close to that weight now. I am a 6’1” man, so my belly tends to enter a room before I do. At my thinnest, I was 160 pounds. At that weight I tended to look like I had a terminal disease. During my “lean years,” I could not lose enough weight. I felt horrible about myself when I was overweight, and felt embarrassed around other people. I still battle that internal voice.

I recently read a terrific article by Caroline J. Cederquist, M.D., in which she asked, “How can a man or a woman be accepting of their body when it falls so far outside of society’s vision of the ideal form?” I suppose that many of us who wrestle with our weight face that same question. Cederquist, who is a board-certified bariatric physician, insists that, “it is those who accept their weight and deal with it powerfully who achieve the most profound and lasting weight loss results.” So what does she recommend? Change your internal conversation. Here’s her advice:

1. Begin with the belief that you are far more as an individual than just your weight.
“Shift your internal conversation from one of shame and self-loathing to one of power and possibility begins with the belief that you are far more than just your weight.”

2. Answer the following questions: Who you are presently? Who you will become when you have powerfully dealt with your weight?
“Think of more than just weight loss, but of how you live your life. Maybe today you are ‘limited by your mobility’ but are creating a future of ‘activity and mobility.’ With this example, what does it look like when you are able to do the things that your lack of mobility has prevented? What new possibilities exist for you, and how is your experience of life different?”

3. Think of the action steps you will take to make the future you have envisioned for yourself a reality.
“Outline each step that you will take in becoming a lighter, healthier you. An action step is not, a statement such as ‘lose weight.’ An action step is a specific action that you will take in order to reach your desired outcome.”

For me, the takeaway from Cederquist’s advice was that perspective is everything. It’s akin to the pseudoscientific law of attraction: What you focus on and think about internally is what you’re likely to invite in life. True or not, I subscribe to that theory. Perhaps the first step to lasting weight loss is solely mental. Try envisioning a healthier, happier you for a day or two and see if your perspective changes. Remember, you can always lose weight. But you should never lose yourself to guilt or shame.

About Robard: Robard, a privately-owned, family-oriented company headquartered in central New Jersey, has been a respected leader in the weight loss and management business for more than 40 years. In that time, we have helped tens of thousands of physicians, hospitals, and medical professionals treat countless patients annually, ranging from mildly overweight to severely obese with related chronic conditions. To learn more, visit us online.


Source: Huffington Post

Blog written by Kevin Boyce/Robard Corporation


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Sweeteners: The Inside Scoop



In an effort to better our diets, we often look for healthier choices — especially when it comes to sugar alternatives. Instead of sugar, a large number of shoppers reach for low calorie artificial sweeteners, believing that doing so will offer a similar taste without the guilt and adverse health effects. According to preliminary research, however, artificial sweeteners can do more harm than good. Study results recently presented at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society’s 99th Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida, showed that low calorie, artificial sweeteners could be detrimental to the body’s metabolism.

Results showed that “large consumption of these sugar substitutes could promote fat accumulation, especially in people who are already obese.” Researchers found that there was an increase in glucose transport into cell and overexpression of fat-producing genes, as well as an overexpression of sweet taste receptors in fat tissue.

“We believe that low calorie sweeteners promote additional fat formation by allowing more glucose to enter the cells, and promotes inflammation, which may be more detrimental in obese individuals,” says Sabyasachi Sen, MD, an Associate Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and the study’s principal investigator.

Researchers believe that the findings signify metabolic dysregulation causing cellular mechanisms to make more fat. The effects were most apparent in “obese individuals who consumed low-calorie sweeteners, rather than individuals of normal weight.”

So how do we educate ourselves more about these sweeteners and how it affects obese and overweight patients? For starters, join us on Wednesday, June 14 at 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) for a complementary webcast featuring Registered Dietitian Laurie Shank entitled, How Sweet it is:  Navigating the World of Natural and Artificial Sweeteners. During the webcast, Laurie will discuss commonly used types of natural, caloric sweeteners in the U.S. food supply, as well as the types of artificial, non-nutritive sweeteners approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. while identifying the health risks and benefits of caloric and non-caloric sweetening agents as they relate to health and weight management.

If you want to learn more about artificial sweeteners and the effects on the body this is a presentation you don’t want to miss! To register and find out more, click here.

Source: Endocrine Society


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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A New Solution for Burning Fat Could Be… Fat?



So fat is fat, and all fat is bad, right?

Wrong.

“Not all fat is equal,” says Professor Alexander Pfeifer from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University Hospital Bonn. Apparently, according to recent research out of University of Bonn, researchers have found a way to use what is called “brown fat” to burn energy from food and stimulate weight loss.

Humans actually have two different kinds of fat: white fat (which is the bad fat that makes our “love handles” that we want to get rid of) and brown fat which acts like a desirable heater to convert excess energy into heat. In essence, white fat stores energy, while brown fat helps the body burn energy through heat. In adults, people with higher amounts of brown fat have lower body mass, and according to studies, increasing brown fat by as little as 50 grams could lead up to a 10 to 20 pound weight loss in one year.

Using adenosine, a new signaling molecule typically released during stress, researchers at University of Bonn have discovered a way to activate these brown fat cells, and even turn white fat cells into brown fat cells, a process called “browning.”

More recently, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes identified an FDA-approved drug that can help create more of this brown fat. “Introducing brown fat is an exciting new approach to treating obesity and associated metabolic diseases, such as diabetes,” said study first author Baoming Nie, PhD, a former postdoctoral scholar at Gladstone.

Such a method of treating obesity is still in the research phase, and may not likely become a commonly accepted practice for some time yet. There are several potential side effects that may arise from taking the drug, and more development is necessary before human trials can be explored. Nonetheless, it is an exciting direction in the field of obesity treatment that healthcare professionals should keep a close eye on.

In the meantime, weight management is still an urgent need for so many across the country. For healthcare providers, there are already many effective ways to begin treating obesity. Learn more about how to start a weight management program, or if you are a dieter, connect with a provider who can get you started on your weight loss journey today. Need more inspiration? Listen to some success stories of dieters who have lost more than 200 pounds by starting a medically supervised program.


Source:
ScienceDaily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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