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Sweeteners: The Inside Scoop



In an effort to better our diets, we often look for healthier choices — especially when it comes to sugar alternatives. Instead of sugar, a large number of shoppers reach for low calorie artificial sweeteners, believing that doing so will offer a similar taste without the guilt and adverse health effects. According to preliminary research, however, artificial sweeteners can do more harm than good. Study results recently presented at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society’s 99th Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida, showed that low calorie, artificial sweeteners could be detrimental to the body’s metabolism.

Results showed that “large consumption of these sugar substitutes could promote fat accumulation, especially in people who are already obese.” Researchers found that there was an increase in glucose transport into cell and overexpression of fat-producing genes, as well as an overexpression of sweet taste receptors in fat tissue.

“We believe that low calorie sweeteners promote additional fat formation by allowing more glucose to enter the cells, and promotes inflammation, which may be more detrimental in obese individuals,” says Sabyasachi Sen, MD, an Associate Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and the study’s principal investigator.

Researchers believe that the findings signify metabolic dysregulation causing cellular mechanisms to make more fat. The effects were most apparent in “obese individuals who consumed low-calorie sweeteners, rather than individuals of normal weight.”

So how do we educate ourselves more about these sweeteners and how it affects obese and overweight patients? For starters, join us on Wednesday, June 14 at 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) for a complementary webcast featuring Registered Dietitian Laurie Shank entitled, How Sweet it is:  Navigating the World of Natural and Artificial Sweeteners. During the webcast, Laurie will discuss commonly used types of natural, caloric sweeteners in the U.S. food supply, as well as the types of artificial, non-nutritive sweeteners approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. while identifying the health risks and benefits of caloric and non-caloric sweetening agents as they relate to health and weight management.

If you want to learn more about artificial sweeteners and the effects on the body this is a presentation you don’t want to miss! To register and find out more, click here.

Source: Endocrine Society


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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A New Solution for Burning Fat Could Be… Fat?



So fat is fat, and all fat is bad, right?

Wrong.

“Not all fat is equal,” says Professor Alexander Pfeifer from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University Hospital Bonn. Apparently, according to recent research out of University of Bonn, researchers have found a way to use what is called “brown fat” to burn energy from food and stimulate weight loss.

Humans actually have two different kinds of fat: white fat (which is the bad fat that makes our “love handles” that we want to get rid of) and brown fat which acts like a desirable heater to convert excess energy into heat. In essence, white fat stores energy, while brown fat helps the body burn energy through heat. In adults, people with higher amounts of brown fat have lower body mass, and according to studies, increasing brown fat by as little as 50 grams could lead up to a 10 to 20 pound weight loss in one year.

Using adenosine, a new signaling molecule typically released during stress, researchers at University of Bonn have discovered a way to activate these brown fat cells, and even turn white fat cells into brown fat cells, a process called “browning.”

More recently, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes identified an FDA-approved drug that can help create more of this brown fat. “Introducing brown fat is an exciting new approach to treating obesity and associated metabolic diseases, such as diabetes,” said study first author Baoming Nie, PhD, a former postdoctoral scholar at Gladstone.

Such a method of treating obesity is still in the research phase, and may not likely become a commonly accepted practice for some time yet. There are several potential side effects that may arise from taking the drug, and more development is necessary before human trials can be explored. Nonetheless, it is an exciting direction in the field of obesity treatment that healthcare professionals should keep a close eye on.

In the meantime, weight management is still an urgent need for so many across the country. For healthcare providers, there are already many effective ways to begin treating obesity. Learn more about how to start a weight management program, or if you are a dieter, connect with a provider who can get you started on your weight loss journey today. Need more inspiration? Listen to some success stories of dieters who have lost more than 200 pounds by starting a medically supervised program.


Source:
ScienceDaily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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The Truth About Butter



For at least the last three decades, a shadow has been cast over butter as the artery clogging scourge of all saturated fats to be avoided at all cost, lest we put ourselves at risk for obesity and heart disease. But new information is coming out that suggests that reducing one’s intake of butter and similar dietary fats does not necessarily make you healthier or less at risk for obesity and other comorbid conditions.

A recent paper published in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that butter actually has more of a neutral association with mortality; that is, it’s not really bad for you, but it’s not really good for you either. The researchers collected data on butter consumption and health risks from nine previous studies that, in total, included 636,151 participants, and found that “no significant associations were seen between butter consumption and heart health.”

To be clear, this does not mean that butter is healthy. Small amounts of butter is not an issue, but regular consumption, such as using butter on bread, cooking and frying, can contribute to health risks. The key is to not consume large amounts of butter regularly, and when possible, to substitute it with healthy alternatives. (PRO TIP for weight loss providers: between apple pies and cookies, this is the season when dieters over-consume butter! Download our free staff training guide for tools and strategies to keep your dieters on track.)

“It doesn’t matter that you’re eating it; what matters is what you’re eating it in place of and what else you’re eating,” said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, Dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy and senior author of the paper. “Butter is neither the villain it was made out to be, nor a health food,” he added. “So it’s about your other food choices, not about the butter.”

It’s also important to remember that not all fats are created equal. While limiting saturated fats is a good idea, the trans fats found in butter alternatives like margarine are even worse for you. Plus, there are actually “good” fats known as polyunsaturated fats, found in foods such as avocados, fatty fish like salmon, and olive oil.  These fats help reduce bad cholesterol levels in your blood which can lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. And oils rich in polyunsaturated fats also contribute vitamin E to the diet, an antioxidant vitamin most Americans need more of.

So is butter back? Well… kinda sorta. Don’t stress over a little here and there, but pay attention to your food choices overall. Instead of emphasizing one nutrient, focus on food-based recommendations… whole, minimally processed, nutritious food that is as close to its natural form as possible. Need more help to get your diet on track? Find provider who can help you start a meal program that’s right for you.

Are you a provider dealing with retention challenges during holiday season? We’ve got you covered. Register for Robard’s upcoming free webcast “2017: Your Year to Retain and Regain Clients.”

Sources: CNN, Harvard Public Health, American Heart Association


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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