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Three Important Things to Remember When Dealing with Excess Skin After Weight Loss



In the beginning of their weight loss journeys, many dieters think they’ll lose 40 pounds and look like Cindy Crawford. They fantasize about hitting the beach in the smallest bikini they can find to show off their new body and celebrate all of their hard work. One thing that dieters are sometimes unprepared for, however, is that they still may need to deal with some body image issues after weight loss. One such issue is excess skin.

Dieters who lose significant weight often deal with loose, sagging skin — a remnant of what their bodies used to look like. This happens because while your fat cells shrink when the weight is lost, you still retain the same surface area. The new void under the larger surface area creates a layer of skin that may “hang” because there is less tissue underneath taking up space.

In addition to the detrimental mental and psychological effects this may cause — shame, embarrassment, depression, and anger — excess skin can also put some people at risk for rashes, infections and even immobility. For some patients, once the weight is lost, the journey is not over — but that does not mean the goal is unobtainable.

For many formerly obese and overweight people, learning to love one’s body remains a lifelong pursuit with many challenges along the way. If you are currently dealing with the challenge of excess skin, it is important to remember these three things:

1. YOU DID IT! You lost the weight. You accomplished your goal. Don’t forget that you achieved tremendous success and did something that so many people struggle to realize. In addition to being at a healthy weight, you have most likely also decreased your risk for comorbid conditions that threaten your ability to live a long, healthy life. Celebrate yourself and all that you’ve accomplished, and don’t let this challenge overshadow what you have overcome!

2. Do your research. Just like you didn’t have to settle for being overweight, you don’t have to settle for excess skin that causes you physical and emotional discomfort. There are many resources available to help you work to minimize or get rid of excess skin, from weight training programs to help you build muscle mass and tighten the skin, to more involved solutions like cosmetic surgery. Speak to your healthcare provider about what he/she might suggest.

3. Focus on maintenance. Losing weight was hard; but for many, keeping the weight off can be just as difficult. Many dieters find themselves on a weight loss roller coaster, constantly losing weight and gaining it back. Don’t let the excess skin sidetrack you from maintaining your well-deserved progress. If you need help, find a provider who has a maintenance program which can provide a structure to make it easier for you to keep the weight off, such as Robard’s S.T.A.R. Maintenance Plan.

For providers who want to help their formerly obese and overweight patients maintain weight loss, the S.T.A.R. Maintenance Plan is one of many complimentary programs and services available to Robard customers. Learn more about how to start a program at your center.


Source: U.S. News & World Report

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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5 Ways to Teach Your Daughter about Healthy Weight & Body Image



In the age of social media, the Internet, reality TV, and pop culture, women and girls face an enormous amount of pressure to look a certain way or be a certain weight. More now than ever, weight and body image concerns create an immense amount of anxiety for women, but increasingly more so for young girls. Girls’ dissatisfaction manifests around body image, particularly weight, at an alarmingly young age:

• Over 80 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat.
• By middle school, 40-70 percent of girls are dissatisfied with two or more parts of their body, and body satisfaction hits rock bottom between the ages of 12 and 15.

And while it’s natural to be concerned about our daughters’ weight and to encourage them to be healthy, a recent study from Cornell Food & Brand Lab says that one of the best things you can do to encourage healthy weight and positive body image is … don’t talk about her weight!

The study published in Eating and Weight Disorders surveyed 501 women between the ages of 20 and 35 and asked them to recall how often their parent(s) commented on their weight. The findings showed that women whose parents were less likely to comment on their weight or how much food they ate were also less likely to be overweight as adults. Interestingly, women who recalled their parents commenting on their weight in their youth were generally more likely to be dissatisfied with their weight in adulthood, regardless of whether they were overweight or not.

“If you're worried about your child's weight, avoid criticizing them or restricting food. Instead, nudge healthy choices and behaviors by giving them freedom to choose for themselves and by making the healthier choices more appealing and convenient," recommends lead author Brian Wansink. "After all, it's the choices that children make for themselves that will lead to lifelong habits." 

If you are a parent and hope to encourage a healthy weight and positive body image in your daughter, there are many other ways to do so that won’t lead to unintended negative affects later in life. Take a look at the slideshow that suggest 5 positive ways to teach your daughter about healthy weight and body image.



Sources: Cornell Food & Brand Lab, NYC Girls Project


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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3 Tips to Erase Negative Body Image



When you look in the mirror, what do you see? How do you feel? If you were given a magic wand that enabled you to change anything about your body, would your body weight, size, or shape be high on the list? If you find yourself being extra critical of your body in your reflection, you’re not alone.

In a 2014 survey of 2,000 adults conducted by TODAY/AOL about body image, 60 percent of adult women and 36 percent of men have negative thoughts about themselves weekly, with a particular preoccupation with the appearance of their stomachs (69 percent of women worrying about their tummies compared to 52 percent of men).

It’s hard to feel happy about ourselves in an increasingly social media-driven world. We are bombarded daily by the images of the super-thin, super-fit, and seemingly super-happy celebrity elite in magazines, TV, Instagram, and more. And on the flip side, there is an immense amount of disparaging stigma in society around being overweight or obese. Many scientific studies demonstrate this point, showing that people with excess weight are often perceived as being “less intelligent, lonelier, having less self-control, more lazy.”

While losing weight for many is crucial to improving their health, it’s also important to acknowledge the psychological and emotional toll that can come with being overweight, which can lead to negative body image and become harmful in our daily lives, even sabotaging healthy weight loss goals.

If you are embarking on a dieting, weight management, or exercise plan to lose weight and be healthier, remember that the journey can and should be an empowering one. Rather than being motivated by guilt or shame, replace those feelings with joy and pride for the amazing changes you are making for your health and your life.

Negative body image is not something that you can necessarily change overnight; however, with some helpful tools and habit changes, you may start to see yourself differently, even before you start shedding major pounds.
Here are three tips you can start today to start turning around negative body image:

1. Start daily affirmations. Tell yourself how awesome, beautiful, and worthy you are – even if you don’t quite believe it yet. Look yourself in the mirror, smile, and say OUT LOUD at least one thing about yourself that makes you feel proud to be you.
2. Be mindful of negative thinking. We drown ourselves in negative thinking more often than we realize. When you find yourself having negative thoughts about your body, stop and check in with yourself. Be present with the thought and remind yourself that it doesn’t have to be true. Replace the negative thought with a positive one, smile, breathe, and move on.
3. Avoid disparaging media. If you find that looking at magazines with wafer thin models make you feel bad about yourself, stop consuming them. Instead, consciously seek out media that reinforces positive self-image. Look for magazines, TV shows, or social media that speak to your interests outside of physical appearance, like travel or gardening. Or look to informational blogs or articles that emphasize the importance of wellness and health to support healthy weight loss goals.

If you need a push in the right direction, click through the slideshow below for some inspirational quotes and messages that will lift your spirits. Maybe one of them will serve as tomorrow’s daily affirmation!




Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation



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