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Healthier Concession Stand Options Yield Positive Results



When we go a sporting event, chances are we’re going to visit the concession stand during the game. The lines may be long and the prices exorbitant, but we still get in the queue for one thing: The food. And let’s be honest, no one goes to a sporting event concession stand to eat a salad. And while the options we have at these events generally don’t lead to healthy food choices, a recent study may show that a revamped concession stand menu may not only help people’s diets, but overall profits as well.

The University of Iowa and Cornell University joined a booster organization to perform a study to see what happens when healthier options were made available to people that attended sporting events at Muscatine High School in Muscatine, Iowa, for two fall sports seasons one year apart. The results? “We found that an average of 77 percent of students purchased healthier foods when they were available and that revenue also increased when a variety of healthy items were available,” says study co-author Brian Wansink, PhD, Professor and Director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab.

Whether the students thought adding healthy options was important or not, an overwhelming majority — 77.5 percent — purchased at least one healthy item from the concession stand at some point in the school year. Although the study has a small sample size and is focused on one school and their students, the findings may open to the door to adding healthier items at large scale sporting events.

Millions of people go through the turnstile annually to see their favorite team or player perform, and many of them will purchase items at the concession stands. There is no guarantee that they will purchase a healthy option when looking at the menu, but studies like this suggest that just making the healthy options available could lead to better choices made by the consumer. The fact that the study also showed an increase in sales (9.2 percent of total sales went to healthier items) indicates that the healthier choices also could help overall profits. That’s big business when you’re looking at a sold out football stadium.

Until healthier choices become more readily available at these events, you can still take action to stay on track and maintain a good diet. For example, bring a small snack of your own. A simple plan like this helps to develop good habits and reinforces avoiding bad ones that could result in unwanted weight gain or stalled progress with your diet. If you’d like to start your own weight loss journey and learn how to make better health decisions, fill out our brief Find a Clinic form and we will find a weight management program near you! In the meantime, game on!


Source: Cornell Food & Brand Lab


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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A New Solution for Burning Fat Could Be… Fat?



So fat is fat, and all fat is bad, right?

Wrong.

“Not all fat is equal,” says Professor Alexander Pfeifer from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University Hospital Bonn. Apparently, according to recent research out of University of Bonn, researchers have found a way to use what is called “brown fat” to burn energy from food and stimulate weight loss.

Humans actually have two different kinds of fat: white fat (which is the bad fat that makes our “love handles” that we want to get rid of) and brown fat which acts like a desirable heater to convert excess energy into heat. In essence, white fat stores energy, while brown fat helps the body burn energy through heat. In adults, people with higher amounts of brown fat have lower body mass, and according to studies, increasing brown fat by as little as 50 grams could lead up to a 10 to 20 pound weight loss in one year.

Using adenosine, a new signaling molecule typically released during stress, researchers at University of Bonn have discovered a way to activate these brown fat cells, and even turn white fat cells into brown fat cells, a process called “browning.”

More recently, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes identified an FDA-approved drug that can help create more of this brown fat. “Introducing brown fat is an exciting new approach to treating obesity and associated metabolic diseases, such as diabetes,” said study first author Baoming Nie, PhD, a former postdoctoral scholar at Gladstone.

Such a method of treating obesity is still in the research phase, and may not likely become a commonly accepted practice for some time yet. There are several potential side effects that may arise from taking the drug, and more development is necessary before human trials can be explored. Nonetheless, it is an exciting direction in the field of obesity treatment that healthcare professionals should keep a close eye on.

In the meantime, weight management is still an urgent need for so many across the country. For healthcare providers, there are already many effective ways to begin treating obesity. Learn more about how to start a weight management program, or if you are a dieter, connect with a provider who can get you started on your weight loss journey today. Need more inspiration? Listen to some success stories of dieters who have lost more than 200 pounds by starting a medically supervised program.


Source:
ScienceDaily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Weight Loss Programs Help Fight Cardiovascular Disease



One of the biggest benefits, if not the biggest, of losing weight is minimizing or completely remedying other ailments and comorbidities that come with being overweight. Type 2 Diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol, hypertension, sleep apnea and more have been associated with being overweight. Another one is cardiovascular disease, which consists of heart conditions that may include the vessels, structural problems, blood clots, and more. A recent study showed how effective losing weight can be in regards to treating cardiovascular diseases, and the results may surprise you.

One hundred and twenty-nine patients entered into the WAIT (Weight Achievements and Intensive Management) program that lasted 12 weeks and yielded great results: the participants enjoyed an average weight loss of 9.7 percent (24 pounds) and were able to maintain 6.4 percent of that loss (16 pounds) for five years, on average.

Participants of the study were split into two groups. One group were those that achieved seven percent or more of their weight loss, while the second group achieved less than seven percent of their weight loss after a year. The study showed that the group that lost seven percent or more of their initial weight loss (the first group) experienced significant improvements in their comorbidities, which included their A1C levels, their LDL and HDL levels, and improved blood pressure.

“This weight loss was very impressive, since we know from previous research that if this population can maintain a seven percent weight loss, they show a marked improvement in insulin sensitivity and many other cardiovascular risk factors,” says Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, and Medical Director of Joslin Diabetes Center’s obesity clinical program.

Similar studies have shown how effective a proper weight management program can be. The right program can give someone an opportunity to lose weight, maintain the loss, and mitigate or even eliminate the comorbidities that come with it. Sounds like a win-win for the patient and the provider!

Learn more about offering a weight management program, or if you are a dieter needing weight loss assistance, click here.


Source: Joslin Diabetes Center


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation


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