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Healthcare Providers Want to Learn More about Diet, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention



As the obesity epidemic continues to grow, it is imperative that healthcare providers and their patients are well versed in methods to combat the disease as well as associated comorbidities. And now, a recent survey shows the willingness of healthcare providers to increase their knowledge on this subject. 

A 28-question survey, created by a team from the NYU Langone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, was administered to more than 200 cardiologists and internal medicine physicians and trainees. The survey was created to find gaps in nutritional knowledge as well as evaluate the attitudes and practices of physicians in regards to diet and cardiovascular disease. What they found was the majority was open to additional training and thought it would improve their patient care. 

Most of the survey respondents — 78 percent — were open to additional training and thought it would result in better patient care. Just over half of the physicians said they currently spend three minutes or less educating patients on diet and lifestyle.

Overall, the survey sheds light on the physicians’ understanding of nutritional principles, their practical knowledge, and the frequency the provider refers a patient to a dietitian or nutritionist. (Most of the physicians didn't routinely refer their patients to a dietitian or nutritionist.) Information gathered from survey will hopefully help providers and ultimately help their patients. It’s a step in the right direction for us to better understand diet and cardiovascular disease and use the information to better treat and prevent comorbidities in patients.

“The fact that most physicians would welcome additional training in diet is a useful — and hopeful — finding of the study. It speaks to where we are now in medicine. Patients, too, are looking for additional ways to improve their cardiovascular risk,” says Nichole Harkin, MD, chief cardiology fellow at the NYU Langone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

If you are one of the many healthcare professionals interested in increasing your knowledge of diet and lifestyle change for your patients, join us at the 7th Annual Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference in Baltimore, July 23-25, 2015. It’s the most comprehensive conference available. Visit www.Obesity-conference.com to learn more. 

Source: NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine



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Variety by the Pound



If I gave you something, there isn’t much decision needed on your part on what you receive. However, what if I gave you two things and told you to choose one? That can tend to be a little more difficult.

Now take that analogy and multiply it by a million. The amount of food choices we have in the grocery store is staggering. And now researchers in the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine believe the results of a recent study show that too many food choices could lead to obesity.

The study was administered on mice but was one of the first to present a real life scenario of having to choose between certain foods — some healthier than others. Other experiments involving mice actually tried to show the correlation of the mother’s diet to her offspring — similar to how scientists study women’s diets during pregnancy to see if it negatively affects the diet of the child.

The study showed that when there was a choice between a high-fat or low-fat diet, the body weight, body fat and glucose levels of the mice rose. Mice that only received a low-fat diet had no change in such metrics.

Researchers believe this is a peek into how humans face these situations, and for us it can result in weight gain. However, it’s a choice. Even though there are a variety of unhealthy food options, there are plenty of healthy alternatives. It’s just a matter of what you choose.

Source: Virginia Tech



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2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference Offers 25.25 Available CE Credits


Dannemiller, supported by an educational grant from Robard Corporation, will be holding its 2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference from July 23-25, 2015. The 7th annual conference provides remarkable and unmatched insight into the world of obesity by some of the best minds in the industry.

With 30 obesity management lectures, the conference boasts a wealth of topics, including treatment of obesity-related eating disorders, optimal management of the pre-and-post bariatric surgery patient, the link between obesity and cancer, and many more.

25.25 available CE Credits will be available to attendees of the conference, making this an ideal event for physicians, surgeons, psychologists, nurses, dietitians, behaviorists, and other professionals to attend, as well as it being a great opportunity to network with numerous healthcare professionals throughout the country. 

This year, the conference will held at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore on the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Maryland. For more information regarding agenda and speakers, testimonials, or to register for the Early Bird Rates, visit www.obesity-conference.com.

Also, click here to take a look at the highlight video of last year’s conference for a peek into what the conference has to offer!

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