RobardUser Robard Corporation | Weight Management Advice for Dieters & Healthcare Professionals

Medical Providers Aren’t Learning About Obesity



When discussing weight, there’s a disconnection between the dieter and healthcare provider. Many providers find it difficult to even broach the subject, despite the escalating rise in the disease its related chronic conditions. It would seem that the importance of obesity education is more important than ever. However, the lack of obesity education in medical training is alarming.

According to a recent study conducted by Northwestern Medicine, licensing exams for medical students have a “surprisingly low” amount of questions in regards to obesity prevention and treatment. Why is this problematic?

“It’s a trickle-down effect,” said lead study author Dr. Robert Kushner. “If it’s not being tested, it won’t be taught as robustly as it should be.” Putting a finer point on it, “The inadequate testing means medical schools have less incentive to provide obesity education in their curriculum, and students have less incentive to learn about it.”

So what’s being done to remedy the situation? For starters, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NMBE) requested that a panel — the same panel of six obesity medicine specialists that reviewed test items from several United States Medical Licensing Examinations to perform the study — identified which topics weren’t adequately covered on the exams in relation to obesity. The panel also suggested that development committees consisting of obesity experts be established in order to begin adding obesity-related elements these exams.

However, something does need to be done in the intermediate. Updates to these exams will benefit future healthcare providers and their patients, but obesity is an intensifying epidemic that needs more immediate, contemporary solutions. As a provider, if treating obesity isn’t or wasn’t one of your primary objectives, maybe it’s time to change that.

Source: Northwestern University


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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How You Can Treat Arthritis – By Not Treating Arthritis



For every pound of excess weight, four pounds of extra pressure are put on the knees. Needless to say, overweight and obese people are at much higher risk of developing arthritis. In fact, an obese person has a 60 percent greater risk of getting arthritis than people who maintain a healthy body weight.

One in five Americans has been diagnosed with arthritis, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that number jumps to more than one in three among obese people — and two out of three Americans are either overweight or obese.

“Weight plays an important role in joint stress, so when people are very overweight, it puts stress on their joints, especially their weight-bearing joints, like the knees and the hips,” says Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology division at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.

While many may disregard arthritis as unimportant and non-life threatening, it is in fact a chronic condition with serious impact on people’s lives. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, and can lead to many debilitating problems for overweight people, from daily pain and discomfort, decreased mobility, and may even necessitate surgery.

One study examined the factors contributing to total knee and hip replacements in people between the ages of 18 and 50. A remarkable 72 percent of those who underwent joint replacement surgery were obese.

Weight loss has been shown to be effective in decreasing the effects, prevalence, and onset of many comorbid conditions, particularly arthritis. A study of overweight women showed that a weight loss of merely 11 pounds reduced their risk of developing knee Osteoarthritis by half.

Healthcare costs attributed to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions (AORC) in the United States in 2003 was approximately $128 billion, and is continuing to increase as obesity continues to rise.  For providers who have patients that suffer from arthritis, or who are at risk for arthritis, weight loss using a medically supervised program can mean an enhanced quality of life for their patients, as well as provide a cost effective solution to arthritis, and many other comorbid conditions.

In a quickly changing healthcare climate, providers must be quick to adopt smarter and cost-effective strategies to reduce expenditures while maximizing quality of care. Treating comorbid conditions singularly without looking at the bigger picture of what is causing these ailments will increasingly become a costly mistake for both physicians and their patients. Talk to Robard today about how to streamline your patient care efforts by starting a medical weight management program today.

Sources: CDC, John Hopkins Arthritis Center, Everyday Health, Arthritis Foundation


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Stress and Weight Gain



We all experience stress in our lives. But, did you know that stress could be a contributor to weight gain and preventing you from losing weight? Stress causes our bodies to produce increased amounts of stress hormones. These hormones cause a rush of adrenaline that is sometimes referred to as the “Fight or Flight Response.” When the brain receives a signal that the body is under stress, it releases the stress hormones to help the body endure whatever is upon it. It makes one ready for action and endurance. The human body is made to survive.

However, after the adrenaline rush is over, the body continues to make cortisol. This is the hormone that triggers hunger or the “replenish mode.” For our ancestors, this was necessary. They may have gone long periods of time without eating and endured a harsh physical environment without knowing when they would eat again. Our ancestors needed the cortisol due to high levels of physical stress and activity. Often, they burned double the calories they consumed just looking for their food.

We can hardly say that now. However, despite the decline in physical activity, we are under as much stress today as our ancestors. Much of our stress comes in the form of mental and emotional. Even physical stress, such as chronic illness, brings with it an emotional toll.

Cortisol and the “replenish mode” are designed to allow for survival. Cortisol slows our metabolism to conserve energy and resources. This means we hang on to fat stores. This may not have been a problem for our great-great-great grandparents who hunted and gathered their food supply, however, driving to the nearest drive-through or ordering take-out is not such strenuous work. Add a slow metabolism from cortisol and you get added weight gain.

So, how can you start now to decrease your stress and prevent weight gain? Here are some tips:

1. Take your vitamins. Your B-vitamins and magnesium to be exact. The B-vitamins provide energy and nervous system function and magnesium is known to reduce anxiety. Most of us are not getting enough of these vitamins in our diets.
2. Get protein for breakfast. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day only if it is protein packed. Experts recommend 35 grams or more to get your metabolism cranked, increase your energy level, and keep you satiated longer.
3. Exercise more. Not only are you burning calories and increasing your metabolism, you are reducing your stress level. When you are on the elliptical, bike, treadmill, or in a yoga pose, you can sweat away the day’s concerns and burn off that adrenaline.
4. Get a good night’s sleep. At least 7-9 hours per night to combat cravings. Lack of sleep makes you hungry.
5. No crash diets or starving. When you drastically restrict a food group or reduce your calorie intake, you slow your metabolism further. This will not help when under stress. Instead, find a well-balanced, high protein, low carb diet plan and drink plenty of water. There are plenty of food options for quick, on-the-go nutrition and protein.
6. Eat mindfully. By eating slowly, you give your body time to realize you are full. Mindful eating makes us more aware of emotional eating and combats the cortisol levels our bodies are producing from stress.
7. Seek help. Often stress in life is more than we can handle alone. Seek out a therapist, a health care professional, a support group, or health coach. Do not be ashamed to ask assistance during a difficult time.




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