RobardUser Robard Corporation | Weight Management Advice for Dieters & Healthcare Professionals

The #1 Thing That Physicians Should Be Talking About, But Aren't….



If you aren’t practicing obesity treatment in your health practice, you may be ignoring a huge elephant in the room. Physicians can sometimes be hesitant to open that door because of many reasons: lack of knowledge on how to implement weight loss; not having enough time or resources; or maybe you have been so busy treating other chronic conditions that you haven’t even considered obesity treatment or that it could actually be the cause of many of your patients’ ailments.

While these reasons are all understandable, the imperative is clear: the elephant in the room is only getting bigger, and we can no longer afford to ignore it.

The State of Obesity Initiative has recently put out a wealth of information and resources about obesity and what we can do as individuals and communities to combat it. Their report points out that obesity rates have only risen to more and more dangerous levels. And continuing to not talk about it is only making the problem of obesity worse.

The report correctly shows that “obesity remains one of America's most pervasive, expensive and deadly health problems.” Among many other issues, the report states:

• Obesity is a financial issue. The obesity crisis costs our nation more than $150 billion in healthcare costs annually and billions of dollars more in lost productivity.
• Obesity is an equity issue. Obesity disproportionately affects low-income and rural communities as well as certain racial and ethnic groups, including Blacks, Latinos and Native Americans.
• Obesity is a top national priority. Americans (registered voters) rated obesity as the top health concern in the country in a recent public opinion survey.

Whether you know it or not, obesity is a problem that your patients need and want support for, but they may not know how to ask for help. But that’s where you can step in and provide the proactive assistance that they trust you to give. Arming yourself with the knowledge about the problem of obesity can be the first step in building your own confidence to tackle this sensitive but important issue.

To help you in this process, take a look at our short, informative, AND FREE on-demand webcast “Updates in Obesity” by Dr. Christopher Case, a member of Robard’s distinguished Medical Advisory Panel.  As an endocrinologist, Dr. Case cares for patients with diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, cholesterol disorders, and diseases of the thyroid and adrenal and pituitary glands, and has a wealth of knowledge about obesity and how it impacts overall health. Take a moment to check it out, and then contact us to learn about even more free educational and business resources that Robard provides to help you address the elephant in the room at your practice.





Source:
The State of Obesity


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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Study: Providers Cite Lack of Knowledge as a Major Barrier to Treating Patients with Obesity



By now, the need to prioritize obesity treatment in health care is widely accepted. Not a single state met the 2010 Healthy People goal of a 15% obesity rate. Instead, obesity rates have steadily climbed, with over one-third of American adults being obese, and with the United States ranking as one of the most obese countries in the world. And with obesity rates rising, so do the rates of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

With obesity officially having been classified as a disease in 2013 by the American Medical Association, more providers understand the links between obesity and other chronic conditions, as well as the importance of obesity treatment. But a recent study from George Washington University shows that this transition to prioritizing obesity treatment is not an easy one because most providers lack knowledge and understanding of recommended obesity treatments, such as behavioral counseling and pharmacotherapy.

In an accompanying editorial published in Obesity, Robert Kushner, MD, FTOS, examines the impact of this study. He concluded that, “The study suggests that more obesity education is needed among primary health care providers that focuses on knowledge along with enhanced competencies in patient care management, communication, and behavior change.”
 
Staying up-to-date with new information and best practices can be extremely difficult for a busy health care provider while the demands of the business and the patients remain high. But finding partners who can do some of the heavy lifting for you can support you in not only getting the necessary knowledge, but also streamlining your practices and provide you and your staff with the essential training and tools to implement this important service that will help your patients get healthier quicker, while saving your practice time and money.w

We encourage you to take advantage of free resources, like Robard’s three-part webcast series on How to Speak to Patients about Obesity, which can walk you through step-by-step on how to get this conversation started with patients.

If you understand how imperative it is to start addressing weight loss in your patients, but just aren’t sure how to get started, reach out to Robard today!

Source: Science Daily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Three Important Tips to Help Patients Deal with Excess Skin after Weight Loss



In the beginning of a weight loss journey, many patients think they’ll lose 40 pounds and look like Cindy Crawford. They fantasize about hitting the beach in the smallest bikini they can find to show off their new body and celebrate all of their hard work. One thing that weight loss patients are sometimes unprepared for, however, is that they still may need to deal with some body image issues after weight loss. One such issue is excess skin.

Dieters who lose significant weight often deal with loose, sagging skin — a remnant of what their bodies used to look like. This happens because even though fat cells shrink when the weight is lost, the body still retains the same surface area. The new void under the larger surface area creates a layer of skin that may “hang” because there is less tissue underneath taking up space.

In addition to the detrimental mental and psychological effects this may cause — shame, embarrassment, depression and/or anger — excess skin can also put some people at risk for rashes, infections and even immobility. For some patients, once the weight is lost, the journey is not over — but that does not mean the goal is unobtainable.

For many formerly obese and overweight people, learning to love one’s body remains a lifelong pursuit with many challenges along the way. If you have patients currently dealing with the challenge of excess skin, here are three things you can say and do for them that can help motivate them to continue on in the journey:

1. “YOU DID IT!” Remind your patients of how far they have come, how much weight they have lost, and how many goals they have achieved. Remind them that they achieved tremendous success and did something that so many people struggle to do. In addition to being at a healthy weight, they have most likely also decreased their risk for comorbid conditions that threaten their ability to live a long, healthy life. Celebrate with them, and don’t let this challenge overshadow what they have overcome!
2. Provide referrals. Know what resources (both medical and cosmetic) are out there to help patients deal with issues like excess skin. There are many resources available to help your patients work to minimize or get rid of excess skin, from weight training programs to help build muscle mass and tighten the skin, to more involved solutions like cosmetic surgery. Have a resource list of your area available. If you need help developing one, contact us about how some of our complimentary business support services might be able to support.
3. Focus on maintenance. Losing weight was hard; but for many, keeping the weight off can be just as difficult. Many dieters find themselves on a weight loss roller coaster, constantly losing weight and gaining it back. Don’t let the excess skin sidetrack your patients from maintaining their well-deserved progress. Having a maintenance program is essential to your patients’ continued weight loss success in the long-term. Download our exclusive, free staff training kit, “Added Value Maintenance,” that walks your staff through some key elements of the Maintenance Phase of weight loss.

For providers who want to help their formerly obese and overweight patients maintain weight loss, the S.T.A.R. Maintenance Plan is one of many complimentary programs and services available to Robard customers. Learn more about how to start a program at your center.


Editor’s Note: This blog was originally published in March 2017 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.


Source: U.S. News & World Report


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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