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Why Weight Loss is Not as Simple as Cutting Calories



When it comes to calorie counting, not many people — if any at all — like doing it. It’s monotonous, tedious and restrictive, and it takes all the joy out of eating. You counted all your calories, so you should be losing weight, right? Well, not necessarily. If you stop to think about what a calorie is, you will find that it’s not just how many calories you consume that affects healthy weight loss, but what kinds of calories.

Simply put, a calorie is a unit of energy. Our bodies actually need calories to survive because without energy, our cells would die, and our organs would stop functioning. We acquire this energy through food and drink in the form of calories. The number of calories food contains tells us how much potential energy they possess.

Keeping track of how many calories one consumes is, of course, important to weight loss. If you burn off more calories than you consume through physical activity, the body will locate other calories to burn for energy, ultimately using the calories from the body’s fat reserves, and thus stimulating weight loss.

The problem comes in when “empty calories” are consumed; that is, foods high in energy but low in nutritional value. Such foods include fast foods, and foods high in fat and/or sugar, such as ice cream and bacon. More than 11 percent of Americans’ daily calories come from fast foods, and Americans consume an average of 336 calories per day from sugary beverages alone. To put it more simply, 2,000 calories in the form of vegetables and lean protein will provide a very different result than 2,000 calories in the form of a large fast food burger.

Ultimately, to achieve fast and, most importantly, healthy weight loss, it is important to advise patients to stick to a low calorie diet, but through foods and supplements that are high in nutritional value. Many people continue to find it challenging to stick to a low calorie diet on their own. This is why it is important for health professionals to be proactive in asking overweight patients about their weight loss goals*, and educating them not just about the benefits of achieving a healthy weight, but also about the options that are available to them, such as a Very Low Calorie Diet (VLCD) or Low Calorie Diet (LCD). With a medically supervised VLCD, patients could expect to lose three-five pounds a week, enjoying a variety of meal replacements, snacks, and food products that taste great and are scientifically designed to have high nutritional value.

Obesity is on the rise, and healthcare costs and early mortality rates are rising with it. But adding weight loss as a service for your patients is easier than you might think, and can actually get started in 60 days or less with the help of an experienced partner. Contact Robard today and learn how you can increase the quality of care for your patients by starting an obesity treatment program.

*For practical tips on how to speak with patients about their weight, check out this free webcast!

Source: Medical News Today


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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3 Types of Eating Dysregulation Underlying Patients’ Higher Weights




A major reason for the failure of current medical treatment for “overweight” is that “weight” problems often are actually eating problems. Higher weight may be due to genetic loading, metabolic or hormonal conditions, neurotransmitter imbalances, chronic dieting and weight cycling, or other causes, but it often occurs because people are eating in ways that are out of sync with appetite cues for hunger, pleasure and satiation. To resolve this problem, eating disorders’ therapists have been successfully using psychology of eating approaches for more than three decades and it’s time for other health care professionals to follow their lead.

Dysregulated eating comes in several varieties, including emotional eating, mindless eating, and binge-eating. Usually patients have more than one form of eating dysfunction and often engage in all three types. Underlying them all is anticipated or actual distress (generally felt as anxiety or bodily tension) lessened by the act of eating, which prevents or reduces it. Discomfort might come from obsessing all evening about the leftover lasagna in the refrigerator and keeping busy to refrain from eating it, then finally scarfing it down in one fell swoop before falling exhausted into bed. Or, distress might arise in a flash, driving someone to mindlessly polish off three cookies in a four-pack, in spite of having reached satiation after having consumed only one. In broader clinical terms, this dysregulated dynamic could be called obsession (intrusive thoughts about eating or distress about refraining from eating) followed by compulsion (the act of eating), which reduces the anxiety caused by the intense food craving. Thus, is habit formed, for who wants to experience ongoing internal angst when it could be made to disappear in a delicious twinkling. This dysfunctional dynamic overrides “normal” eating appetite cues: to eat when hungry, choose foods that are enjoyable, eat with awareness and an eye toward pleasure, and stop eating when full (quantity) or satisfied (quality).

Here is how dysregulated eating plays out in emotional, mindless or binge-eating:

1. Emotional eating is done to avoid, prevent or reduce emotional distress which may be caused by internal or external stress, memories, or simply experiencing mildly unpleasant or uncomfortable feelings. Emotional eating is meant to cheer you up or calm you down. Eating a pint of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream might act as a pick-me-up and be the highlight of a boring Saturday night alone or, alternately, help soothe rattled nerves after your boss chews you out in front of your entire department or you finally mail in your taxes minutes before the federal tax deadline. Such eating has a distinct, specific purpose: to re-regulate emotional dysregulation by tuning it up or toning it down. It also can serve as a prophylactic to unwanted feelings such loneliness, anger or disappointment. Why feel bad when you can, instead, eat something that tastes good? 

2. Mindless eating is just that—snacking or grazing through what’s in your food cabinets or refrigerator on auto-pilot. Or it could play out as overeating because you’re not paying attention to fullness or satisfaction cues. Mindless eating is done as if you’re in a trance and is usually not driven by any one specific discomfiting emotion, unless it’s boredom or the desire to avoid tasks. It’s done because there is food somewhere to be had. You think of it or see it and you eat it. It’s that simple, no thinking required. Unconscious eating is also born of habit: before you flop down on the sofa to watch TV, you automatically gran a bag of chips or you keep eating simply because the food is in front of you. Overeating is another form of mindless eating. When it’s all gone, you’re done, and not before.

3. Binge-eating is classified as a Feeding and Eating Disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. It involves eating an excessively large amount of food in a short period of time—often rapidly, with little awareness, to well beyond full—“on average, at least once a week for 3 months” without the ability to control intake, followed by feelings of guilt, shame, or disgust (1). Bingeing is a self-driven activity that takes on a life of its own, an act accompanied by feelings of frenzy, madness and desperation. In its aftermath, the stomach feels distended and aches and you are wracked with guilt, shame and remorse.

To understand patients’ specific eating problems, health care professionals need to ask questions about their state of mind before, during and after eating. Moreover, patients need to hear that they are not bad, permanently defective or societal outcasts because of their dysfunctional eating patterns, and that they can resolve them by obtaining emotional and psychological support via therapy and intuitive-eating or health coaching, as well as through groups, workshops, books, blogs, podcasts and videos tailored to healing dysregulated eating.

Endnote
(1) American Psychiatric Association, ed. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013), 350.


Disclaimer: Please note that this article is intended for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for the medical or psychological assessment, advice and individualized care from your personal health care provider or mental health professional. Please consult with your personal health care professional regarding your individual situation and concerns. For health care providers, the information contained herein may not be applicable or appropriate for every patient. Paige O’Mahoney, M.D. and Deliberate Life Wellness LLC specifically disclaim any and all liability arising directly or indirectly from the use of any information or products contained in these materials. Mention of products, techniques, methods, resources, approaches, or other entities in our materials is for informational purposes only and does not indicate endorsement.






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One-Third of the World is Overweight and We Are Part of the Problem



According to a recent article by CNN, 2 billion adults and children worldwide – the equivalent of one-third of the world’s population -- is overweight, and the U.S. is among the countries most severely affected.

The article reflected the results of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that included 195 countries and territories. The study also notes that an increasing number of people globally are dying from comorbid conditions related to obesity, such as cardiovascular disease.

“People who shrug off weight gain do so at their own risk -- risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and other life-threatening conditions,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, who worked on the study. “Those half-serious New Year’s resolutions to lose weight should become year-round commitments to lose weight and prevent future weight gain,” he said in a statement.

The conclusions of the study do important work in highlighting obesity as a growing concern in global public health as a chronic condition in and of itself; however, researchers also hope to educate the public at large about the link between obesity and other diseases in the hopes that preventative measures and treatment can help people avert early mortality. Almost 70 percent of deaths related to an elevated BMI in the analysis were due to cardiovascular disease, killing 2.7 million people in 2015, with diabetes being the second leading cause of death.

The study notes that obesity rates rose in all countries studied, irrespective of the country’s income level. “Changes in the food environment and food systems are probably major drivers,” they write. “Increased availability, accessibility, and affordability of energy dense foods, along with intense marketing of such foods, could explain excess energy intake and weight gain among different populations.”

While obesity rates continue to rise in the U.S., with approximately one-third of our own adult population being overweight or obese, we are luckier than other countries to have access to medical resources that can help curb this epidemic. Now more than ever, the need to begin treating obesity is becoming a public health imperative and medical providers are being called on to lead the charge. (Interested in learning how obesity treatment affects population health? Register for this free webcast!)

Treating obesity is easier than you may think, especially when you work with an experienced partner. Robard takes all the guess work out of treating obesity, and provides all the tools and resources to get you started within 60 days. Join in the conversation that’s happening, not just around the country, but around the world, and learn more about medical weight management today.




Source: CNN

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation



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