RobardUser Robard Corporation | Weight Management Advice for Dieters & Healthcare Professionals

Want to save $30k? New Study Says Lose the Excess Weight



How would you feel about having an extra $31,447 in your pocket? Well, according to findings in a new John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study, that is the average savings in direct medical costs and productivity losses that a 40-year-old adult could expect to see by going from obese to normal weight.

But the study also found that cost savings is apparent for adults at any age group. A 20-year-old adult who goes from obese to healthy weight would see an average savings of $28,020 over their lifetime. After age 50, the largest cost savings occur when an individual with obesity moves to the normal weight, with an average savings of $36,278.

Think about what someone could if they lost all their unhealthy weight and re-allocated the money they would have spent on health care costs toward savings. They could buy a brand new car… a down payment on a house… a vacation around the world… college tuition for their kids. Why continue to allow obesity to hold our lives back?

There is already a wealth of research that illustrates how obesity and related comorbid conditions affects health care costs, workplace productivity, and job absenteeism. The estimated annual health care costs of obesity-related illness are a staggering $190.2 billion or nearly 21 percent of annual medical spending in the United States. This narrative really brings those numbers home to a more personal level when we take a look at what those costs look like for an individual.

“Most previous models have taken into account one or a few health risks associated with obesity. Subsequently, the forecasted costs may be unrealistic,” says Saeideh Fallah-Fini, PhD, a former GOPC visiting scholar who was part of the research team. “In our study, the model we developed takes into account a range of immediate health complications associated with body weight, like hypertension or diabetes, as well as all major long-term adverse health outcomes, including heart disease and some types of cancer, in forecasting the incremental health effects and costs to give a realistic calculation.”

Achieving a healthy weight provides financial benefits to any individual, medical practice, hospital, or company — it’s a win/win for any person, across any industry and population, and now it’s easier than one might think to put into practice. If you are ready to start reducing health care expenses by treating obesity, take a look at these two opportunities below to learn more and get started:


Related Article: Obesity Treatment Saves Time, Money, and Lives
Sources: Science Daily, National League of Cities

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Free On Demand Webcast: Updates in Obesity 2016-2017



Obesity treatment research is continuously updated. It can be challenging to stay abreast of new treatment protocols, pertinent nutrition information, and new solutions. To help health care professionals to stay ahead of the curve, Robard Corporation offers “Updates in Obesity 2016-2017,” a free, on demand webcast video featuring Dr. Christopher Case, a board certified endocrinologist in Jefferson City, Missouri, practicing at Jefferson City Medical Group.

During this presentation, Dr. Case reviews recently published articles in obesity management and the impact in clinical management; defines the role of macronutrients in weight loss and obesity through the examination of current published studies; and, advises you on how to implement practical weight maintenance techniques and applications through the assessment of current research.

Watch the video below. Then, be sure to check out how Robard can help you treat obesity.




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Being Sensitive to Weight Loss Patients’ 'Bad Habits'



How do you get patients to stick with the plan?
Compliance to a medical treatment can be challenging, to say the least. Patients want to be healthier, more active, and more energetic. Yet time and time again, they fall off the wagon and resort to going back into the same old habits that don’t support their progress. Why? (Click here for a flashback on 5 Bad Habits that Lead to Weight Gain)

For health care providers, it can be frustrating to check in with a patient and hear that their diet or exercise plan isn’t going so well. But it can also help to understand how habits form so you can not only help set realistic expectations for your patient, but also for yourself.

Studies on habit formation have shown that habits form as part of a three-step process. First, there’s a cue, or trigger, that tells your brain to go into automatic mode and let a behavior unfold (i.e. hunger). Then, there’s the routine, which is the actual behavior that we associate as being the “bad habit.” The third step is the reward: Something that your brain likes that helps it remember the “habit loop” in the future. In the case of overweight patients, the pleasure of enjoying “off-limits” food can be their reward. (Learn more about this physiological pleasure connection for those suffering from food addiction in our free white paper.)

Neuroscience has shown that habitual behavior and conscious decision-making are handled by two different parts of the brain, and the area of the brain that controls habits can often supersede and shut down the decision-making area. So when patients revert back to old habits, it is not that they are just battling low motivation or self-control. Their brains are hardwired to return to the behavior that it is used to, even when they no longer benefit from it.

So what can health care providers do?
First off, be patient with your patients. It’s not that they are less committed to their goals; for many it can just be that they require a little more time to relearn healthier habits. Studies show that it can take anywhere from 18 days to 254 days for people to form a new habit. And there will be trips along the way.

Secondly, don’t stress too much about when they mess up. Researchers have found that “missing one opportunity to perform the behavior did not materially affect the habit formation process.” In other words, it doesn’t matter if you mess up every now and then. Reassure your patients that an occasional binge is not the end of the world and encourage them to get back on the horse.

Third, understand that old habits are not forgotten, but replaced with new ones. We can’t magically expect patients to stop a damaging behavior without providing an easier alternative. For overweight people who have an unhealthy relationship with food, there can be a benefit to introducing something like meal replacements. Rather than expecting patients to completely change how they relate to food, they can replace their normal food habits with an easy shake or bar and make it part of a new routine that is easier to implement.

Dr. Valerie Sutherland of Rainier Medical Weight Loss and Wellness notes, “[Patients] typically report that taking food away for a period made a huge difference, even if only for a month. Since food can be addictive for some people, taking it away completely can be crucial for long term change, which is the opposite effect that you may be warned about by some critics of a short term rapid weight loss program that is ‘unsustainable.’”

For a more help on helping patients set realistic goals they can stick with, instantly download our free Short Term Goal Helper Worksheet!

Sources: NPR, MIT News, HuffPost


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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