RobardUser Robard Corporation | October 2017

Weight Loss: An Ancillary Service that Boosts Revenue



Connect the dots: While weight loss is a thriving, several billion dollar industry, group practices are steadily losing revenue. Apparently, there is much to be learned in the medical world about how to tailor the business side of operating a health practice to meet the needs of its patients, or rather, its consumers.

Let’s face it: A medical practice is a business. And businesses need revenue to survive and thrive. Traditionally, most practices have relied on insurance reimbursement for its financial wellness. However, with insurance and health care currently in the political crosshairs, most practices — especially small and mid-sized ones — need to look for ways of being financially independent. This is where ancillary services can come in, and provide a means for practices to generate revenue with fee-for-services options that support their patients with their most pressing health issues. Medically supervised weight loss is an underutilized health care service which can potentially result in a serious influx of consistent revenue.

Think about it — every single medical practice has a built-in clientele for weight loss services. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than two thirds of U.S. adults are overweight and more than one third are obese. It’s safe to say that with this many people suffering from what the American Medical Association has now classified as a chronic disease, most providers have patients with obesity that need to lose weight for a multitude of reasons. In fact, not only are physicians missing out on revenue potential, obesity is actually costing them money because of the expenses linked to treating comorbid conditions directly associated with the disease.

Many doctors who have decided to start offering weight loss services have agreed that it is a stable revenue source with minimal startup costs. In fact, a program can generate nearly $1,000,000 in net revenue in just three years. Plus, getting a program started is much easier than you might think, especially when you work with an experienced partner. Robard helps you change the lives of your patients by providing all of the tools needed to run your own medically supervised weight management program. Centered on personalized nutrition and behavior change, our programs include out-of-the-box components/solutions for your medical team to offer your patients a successful fee-for-service weight loss program. The kicker? We provide you with complimentary support services you need for the lifetime of our relationship.

So really, there’s nothing to lose, but so much to gain. Why continue to struggle financially when there is an untapped profitable market for weight loss already walking through your doors? Ready to learn more? Click here to watch our free webcast on how to incorporate medical weight loss into your existing practice or contact us today and receive a free potential revenue analysis and consultation on how adding this ancillary service can boost your practice profitability!

Sources: Medscape, U.S. News Health


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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The Dos and Don’ts of a Healthy Halloweeen



Halloween is right around the corner! Here are some dos and don’ts to keep you on track on this All Hallows’ Eve:

DON’T give out candy on an empty stomach. The hungrier you are with a bowl of candy close by, the more likely you are to indulge in eating some. Be sure to keep your regular eating habits, and that includes dinner.

DO have healthy snacks close. Even if you aren’t hungry, it can be hard to resist taking a little dive into the sea of miniature candies. Have some fruit or nuts close by that you can reach for instead. Even better, stock up on some Robard bars and snacks. You’ll thank yourself later.

DON’T have the candy in a place you have to look at it all the time. Having the candy right next to you on the couch or table makes it more tempting. Keep the candy by the door and the only time you’ll see it is when you are handing it out to trick-or-treaters. Out of sight, out of mind.

DO buy candy as close to the day as possible. The sooner you buy it, the longer it’s in your house. And that means you have to maintain the willpower to avoid it for a longer period of time. Instead, wait until a day or two before October 31.

DON’T bring left over candy with you wherever you go after Halloween is over. Before you know it you’ll be eating candy for breakfast, lunch and dinner — and a snack in between. If you have leftover candy, leave it at home so after a long day’s work (and a nice workout), you can indulge in a piece if you feel so inclined — but leave it at a piece. Better yet? Save yourself the temptation and bring the leftover candy to work and leave it out for co-workers to enjoy!

DO give out as many treats as you can and leave as little as possible leftover. If the night is over and you have three unopened bags of candy left it means one of two things: 1.) You overestimated how many trick-or-treaters you were going to get; or 2.) You bought too much candy for the occasion. It’s OK to have a little surplus at the end but make a conscious effort to buy only what you’ll think you’ll need.

DON’T buy more candy than you need to. When this time of year comes around candy can be bought at a bargain. Buy just enough so that trick-or-treaters leave your house with a smile on their faces. Don’t buy so much that you will be in a sugar coma by the end of the night by eating leftovers that you didn’t give out.

DO dress in a costume. For our last “do” let’s get into the spirit of the occasion. Halloween has become a day that gives us a reason to have fun! Enjoy yourself! If you’re invited to a costume party then go, but go WITH a costume. It’s more fun and is always a conversation starter!


Blog written by Marcus Miller/ Robard Corporation

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Why Weight Loss is Not as Simple as Cutting Calories



When it comes to calorie counting, not many people — if any at all — like doing it. It’s monotonous, tedious, and restrictive. It takes all the joy out of eating. You counted all your calories, so you should be losing weight, right? Well, not necessarily. If you stop to think about what a calorie is, you will find that it’s not just how many calories you consume that affects healthy weight loss, but what kinds of calories.

Download the Calorie Equation: Learn to indulge in colorful, flavorful foods without loads of calories with this picture lesson from Dr. Howard Shapiro’s book, Picture Perfect Weight Loss.

Simply put, a calorie is a unit of energy. Our bodies actually need calories to survive because without energy, our cells would die, and our organs would stop functioning. We acquire this energy through food and drink in the form of calories. The number of calories food contains tells us how much potential energy they possess.

Keeping track of how many calories one consumes is, of course, important to weight loss. If you burn off more calories than you consume through physical activity, the body will locate other calories to burn for energy, ultimately using the calories from the body’s fat reserves, and thus stimulating weight loss.

The problem comes in when “empty calories” are consumed; that is, foods high in energy but low in nutritional value. Such foods include fast foods, and foods high in fat and/or sugar, such as ice cream and bacon. More than 11% of Americans’ daily calories come from fast foods, and Americans consume an average of 336 calories per day from sugary beverages alone. To put it more simply, 2,000 calories in the form of vegetables and lean protein will provide a very different result than 2,000 calories in the form of a large fast food burger.

Ultimately, to achieve fast and, most importantly, healthy weight loss, it is important to advise patients to stick to a low calorie diet, but through foods and supplements that are high in nutritional value. Many people continue to find it challenging to stick to a low calorie diet on their own. This is why it is important for health professionals to be proactive in asking overweight patients about their weight loss goals*, and educating them not just about the benefits of achieving a healthy weight, but also about the options that are available to them, such as a Very Low Calorie Diet (VLCD) or Low Calorie Diet (LCD). With a medically supervised VLCD, patients could expect to lose 3-5 pounds a week, enjoying a variety of meal replacements, snacks, and food products that taste great and are scientifically designed to have high nutritional value.

Obesity is on the rise, and healthcare costs and early mortality rates are rising with it. But adding weight loss as a service for your patients is easier than you might think, and can actually get started in 60 days or less with the help of an experienced partner. Contact Robard today and learn how you can increase the quality of care for your patients by starting an obesity treatment program.

*For practical tips on how to speak with patients about their weight, check out this free webcast!

Sources: Medical News Today

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in July 2017 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.


Blog written and edited by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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