Eat More, Exercise Less...?

by Robard Corporation Staff June 29, 2015

Quick: What’s the first thing you think of after you eat a Clif Bar or a bowl of Wheaties? Do you want more? You wouldn’t be the only one according to a recent study published in the Journal of Marketing Research which states that not only will you eat more of these “fitness foods,” but you will also exercise less. Researchers believe the root of this comes from “fitness branding” where marketers promote their products as “fitness foods” resulting in the mental relaxation of how much food you’re actually consuming, and you’re your physical activity.

I was a little taken back when I saw this. I’m a fan of Quest Bars personally, as well as Robard’s very own protein supplement bars. But I tend to limit myself to one bar a day, and in the case of me eating more than one, I certainly wouldn’t charge it to “well, its fitness food, so it must be OK.”

But then I noticed that “restrained eaters” were used as the subjects of the study. Restrained eaters are eaters who are chronically concerned about their body weight and, probably most importantly, they are susceptible to overeating. This is a stark contrast from a “natural eater” who “usually eats when hungry, stops when sated, and doesn’t think much about food in-between meals.”

Participants were given trail-mix marked both “Fitness” and “Trail Mix,” and were told to “pretend that they were at home helping themselves to an afternoon snack.” Then, they were given eight minutes to taste and rate the product. Now even though the study wanted to see how the branding of the snacks would affect the eaters, wouldn’t the type of eater they are also play a factor into how they would react?

Studies have been conducted between the correlation between obesity and restrained eating, partially because being a restrained eater could lead to overeating. Signals of hunger, satiety, and other factors that play a role in how you eat aren’t necessarily concise with a restrained eater. However, it is in the natural eaters’ nature to only eat when they have to, no more no less.

The study’s ultimate goal was to have marketers of these products do a better job of including other fitness cues that are a part of being healthy as well as letting people know that there is more to fitness than just the products they are marketing. But don’t we know that? What do you think?

Source: American Marketing Association, Calorie Count

Keywords: , , ,

Filed Under: Eating Habits | Exercise | For Dieters | For Providers | Healthy Eating | Meal Replacements

Asthma Severity Lessens with Weight Loss

by Robard Corporation Staff June 18, 2015




The chronic lung disease, asthma, affects one out of every 12 people in the United States with varying levels of severity. For some, treating asthma can be as simple as using an inhaler when they begin to wheeze; for others, it can be serious enough to completely restrict breathing and result in a trip to the hospital.

The role of being overweight and obese has been frequently studied in regards to the severity of one’s asthma with a universal conclusion: There is a link between how extensive your asthma can be and how much you weigh. However, something that has rarely been studied is how weight loss affects someone’s asthma. Until now.

A Canadian study published in the June issue of the journal CHEST found weight loss reduced asthma severity as measured by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in obese adults. In what is considered one of the more accurate studies on the subject, it was discovered that the incidence of asthma is 1.47 times higher in obese people than non-obese people, and a three-unit increase in body mass index is associated with a 35 percent increase in the risk of asthma. The study supports the active treatment of comorbid obesity in individuals with asthma.

“This study is unique because of its strict adherence to an accurate diagnostic criteria and study outcome (AHR), resulting in purer results to support weight loss as a strategy to normalize or reverse asthma in this group of people hit hard by the condition,” says Smita Pakhale, MD.

The comorbidities associated with obesity are numerous. Yet, asthma and other chronic conditions spurred by obesity are consistently treated with prescriptions and costly office visits. However, it seems like getting to the root cause of these conditions is the best medicine after all. Obesity treatment works.


Source:
American College of Chest Physicians

Keywords: , , ,

Filed Under: Education | For Dieters | For Providers | Obesity | Weight Loss Programs

More Protein Can Improve Appetite and Diet in Teens

by Robard Corporation Staff June 8, 2015


Controlling your appetite is essential to maintaining a healthy diet and weight. A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Missouri shows that protein in the afternoon can reduce your appetite for the rest of the day and reduces unhealthy snacking among teenagers.

“Our research showed that eating high-protein snacks in the afternoon helps teens improve the quality of their diets as well as control appetite,” says Heather Leidy, an assistant professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at MU.
 
The study observed male and female teenagers between the ages of 13 and 19. The snack of choice for the study was a soy-protein pudding. Their findings indicated that including more protein throughout the day helped people consume less fat and improved certain facets in mood and cognitive function.

The study confirms the tangible benefits of snacking healthy as opposed to grabbing the more “convenient” treats, which are often high in fat and sugar. The study also reinforces how protein is immensely beneficial to a healthy diet, showing marked improvements in mood, appetite, and the overall management of weight.

“Our study demonstrated that the positive effects on appetite and satiety can be extended to consuming soy-protein products,” says Leidy. Protein’s role in snacking is similar to its role in weight loss; it can provide satiety for a dieter and be a deterrent from less healthy alternatives.

Source: University of Missouri

Keywords: , ,

Filed Under: Eating Habits | For Dieters | For Providers | Habits | Healthy Eating

Introducing Robard's MyCare Tools

About Robard Corporation

www.Robard.com

With more than three decades of field-tested experience in the weight management industry, Robard Corporation’s comprehensive medical and non-medical obesity treatment programs, state of the art nutrition products, and executive level business management services have assisted a vast network of physicians, large medical groups, hospital systems and clinics to successfully treat thousands of overweight and obese patients. Our turnkey programs offer significant business growth potential, and our dedicated team provides hands-on staff training, services and education to add a new, billable service line for safe and effective obesity treatment within 60 days. For more information, visit us at www.Robard.com or call (800) 222-9201.

Start with Robard Today!

Interested in bringing Robard’s weight management programs, products, and services to your center?

Become a Provider Today

Looking for a Robard program and product provider in your area?

Find a Clinic

Let's Get Social!

Robard Blog Awarded Top Honors

Blog Month List