RobardUser Robard Corporation | March 2015

Watch What You Eat, DON’T Eat What You Watch



Much of what we see on TV is for entertainment and shouldn't be seen as things we act out in real life. Who would have thought that one of those things is cooking? Food television networks often produce exquisite dishes prepared by professionals and amateurs, but when we bring these dishes out of the television and into our kitchen it can add to your waistline. 

A recent University of Vermont study of women aged 20 to 35 showed that women who recreate dishes they viewed on food-related television shows had a higher body mass index (BMI) and weighed on average 10 pounds more compared to women that gathered their food information from sources such as friends and family, magazines, or cooking classes.   

Why is this? According to co-author of the study, Brian Wansink, the dishes we see on food-related networks, “are not the healthiest and allow you to feel like it's OK to prepare and indulge in either less nutritious food or bigger portions.”

Do you know how many calories was in the last dish you saw made on food-related television? Me neither. We don’t really see the nutritional value that any of these prepared dishes have, we just know that it looks (and most likely tastes) good. But one thing we have learned with a level of certainty is taste, although important, isn’t the most crucial factor in preparing a healthy meal — a factor that we may neglect while admiring the dish. 

So where does this leave the food networks? Do they have a responsibility to prepare healthier meals? Or is it the viewer’s responsibility to be mindful of the dishes they see on TV and understand that they may not be the best choice to base a diet on? Maybe it’s a combination of the two. What do you think?

Source: University of Vermont



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Healthcare Providers Want to Learn More about Diet, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention



As the obesity epidemic continues to grow, it is imperative that healthcare providers and their patients are well versed in methods to combat the disease as well as associated comorbidities. And now, a recent survey shows the willingness of healthcare providers to increase their knowledge on this subject. 

A 28-question survey, created by a team from the NYU Langone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, was administered to more than 200 cardiologists and internal medicine physicians and trainees. The survey was created to find gaps in nutritional knowledge as well as evaluate the attitudes and practices of physicians in regards to diet and cardiovascular disease. What they found was the majority was open to additional training and thought it would improve their patient care. 

Most of the survey respondents — 78 percent — were open to additional training and thought it would result in better patient care. Just over half of the physicians said they currently spend three minutes or less educating patients on diet and lifestyle.

Overall, the survey sheds light on the physicians’ understanding of nutritional principles, their practical knowledge, and the frequency the provider refers a patient to a dietitian or nutritionist. (Most of the physicians didn't routinely refer their patients to a dietitian or nutritionist.) Information gathered from survey will hopefully help providers and ultimately help their patients. It’s a step in the right direction for us to better understand diet and cardiovascular disease and use the information to better treat and prevent comorbidities in patients.

“The fact that most physicians would welcome additional training in diet is a useful — and hopeful — finding of the study. It speaks to where we are now in medicine. Patients, too, are looking for additional ways to improve their cardiovascular risk,” says Nichole Harkin, MD, chief cardiology fellow at the NYU Langone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

If you are one of the many healthcare professionals interested in increasing your knowledge of diet and lifestyle change for your patients, join us at the 7th Annual Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference in Baltimore, July 23-25, 2015. It’s the most comprehensive conference available. Visit www.Obesity-conference.com to learn more. 

Source: NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine



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Variety by the Pound



If I gave you something, there isn’t much decision needed on your part on what you receive. However, what if I gave you two things and told you to choose one? That can tend to be a little more difficult.

Now take that analogy and multiply it by a million. The amount of food choices we have in the grocery store is staggering. And now researchers in the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine believe the results of a recent study show that too many food choices could lead to obesity.

The study was administered on mice but was one of the first to present a real life scenario of having to choose between certain foods — some healthier than others. Other experiments involving mice actually tried to show the correlation of the mother’s diet to her offspring — similar to how scientists study women’s diets during pregnancy to see if it negatively affects the diet of the child.

The study showed that when there was a choice between a high-fat or low-fat diet, the body weight, body fat and glucose levels of the mice rose. Mice that only received a low-fat diet had no change in such metrics.

Researchers believe this is a peek into how humans face these situations, and for us it can result in weight gain. However, it’s a choice. Even though there are a variety of unhealthy food options, there are plenty of healthy alternatives. It’s just a matter of what you choose.

Source: Virginia Tech



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